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NEW SE RIES 



ro h\ V : i , , 



O W D O I N 

: O L LEGE 

BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 




v : N 8 W l i K„ MAINE 

PUBLISHED BY THE COLLEGE SIX TIMES A YEAR, IN 
DECEMBER, FEBRUARY, APRIL, MAY, JUNE, & JULY 



D E C E M B E R, * ao 




t office at Brunswick, 



Maine, under the Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



CATALOGUE of 
B O W D O I N 
COLLEGE 

& the Medical School of Maine 

FOR THE YEAR 1907-1908 





BRUNSWICK, MAINE 

Printed for the College , MDCCCCVII 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE BULLETIN, New Series, No. 14. 
These publications include the Annual Catalogue of the College 
and of the Medical School of Maine ; the Annual Report of the 
President, of the Treasurer, and of the Librarian ; the Obituary- 
Record ; and the Bibliographical Contributions. 



THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 
CAMBRIDGE, MASS., U. S. A. 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar 5 

Historical Sketch 7 

Register 9 

Trustees 

Overseers 

Committees of the Boards 

College Preachers 

Officers of Instruction and Government 

Students . . 20 

Summary of Instructors and Students ....... 31 

Recipients of Honors, Prizes, and Degrees 32 

Bowdoin College 37 

Faculty 39 

Admission to the College 4° 

Entrance Examinations 4° 

Required and Elective Studies 53 

Courses of Instruction 5^ 

Administration of the College 80 

Scholarships 84 

Prizes 89 

College Expenses 92 

Buildings 04 

The Library IOO 

Medical School of Maine [03 

Alumni Associations 127 

Special Fitting Schools 129 



1907 


1908 


1909 


JULY 


JAN. 


JULY 


JAN. 


S M T W T F S 
..123456 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 










AUG. 


FEB. 


AUG. 


FEB. 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 

'4 *5 *6 *7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
1 


S M T W T F S 
1 


S M T W T F S 
..123456 

7 8 9 10 11 12 12 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 












SEPT. 


MAR. 


SEPT. 


MAR. 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

29 30 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

29 30 31 


5 M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 
..123456 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 












OCT. 


APRIL 


OCT. 


APRIL 


5 M T W T F S 
.... 1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 *5 *6 *7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 *6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 










NOV. 


MAY 


NOV. 


MAY 


S M T W T F S 
..12 


S M T W T F S 
12 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


S M T W T F S 
1 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 










DEC. 


JUNE 


DEC. 


JUNE 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
..123456 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


5 M T W T F S 
.. .. 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . ; . 


5 M T W T F S 
.. .. 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 











©aientrar 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE 
1907 

September 26 . . First Semester began — Thursday at 8.20 a. m. 
Thanksgiving recess from 12.30 P. M. November 27 to 8.20 

A. m. December 2 
Vacation from 4.30 p. m. December 20 to 8.20 A. M. Jan- 
uary 2, 1908 
January 23 . . . Class of 1868 Prize Speaking — Thursday, 8 P. m. 
Jan. 30 to Feb. 8. Examinations of the First Semester — Thurs- 
day to Saturday of the following week. 
February 10. . . Second Semester begins — Monday. 
February 22 . . . Washington's Birthday : a holiday — Saturday 

Vacation from 10.30 A. m. March 28 to 8.20 A. m. April 7. 
May 30 .... Memorial Day : a holiday — Saturday. 
June 5 . . . . Ivy Day Exercises — Friday. 
June 1 1, 12, and 13. Examinations at Preparatory Schools — Thurs- 
day, Friday, and Saturday. 
June n to 20 . . Examinations of the Second Semester, Thurs- 
day to Saturday of the following week. 
June 21 ... . Baccalaureate Sermon — Sunday, 4 P. M. 
June 22 ... . Alexander Prize Speaking — Monday, 8 P. M. 
June 23 ... . Class Day Exercises — Tuesday, 10 A. M., 3 p. m., 

and 8 p. M. 
June 24 ... . Commencement Exercises of the Medical 

School — Wednesday, 10 A. M., Church. 
Annual Meeting of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, 

11 A. m., Alumni Room, Hubbard Hall. 
The President's Reception — 8 to 11 p. m., 
Hubbard Hall. 
June 25 ... . Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association — 

Thursday, 9 A. M. 
The Commencement Exercises of the College, 

10.30 A. M. 
Commencement Dinner — 12.30 p. M. 
5 



Bowdoin College 

June 25, 26, and 27. Entrance Examinations in Brunswick — Thurs- 
day to Saturday. 
Summer Vacation of Thirteen Weeks. 
Sept. 21 to 23 . . Entrance Examinations in Brunswick — Mon- 
day to Wednesday. 
September 24 . . First Semester begins — Thursday, 8.20 A. m. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL OF MAINE 



1907 
October 24 . 



. . Entrance Examinations for the First Year Stu- 
dents ; in Brunswick — Thursday, 9 A. m. 

October 25 . . . Examinations for Admission to Advanced 

Standing. For Admission to the Second 
Year, Examinations are in Brunswick as fol- 
lows : Anatomy at 9 A. M., Physiology at 2 
p. m., Friday. For Admission to the Fourth 
Year, Examinations are in Portland. 

October 26 . . . Examinations for Admission to Advanced 

Standing. For Admission to the Third and 
Fourth Years, Examinations are in Portland. 

Thanksgiving recess from 1.30 P. M. November 27 to 8 A. m. 
December 2. 

Vacation from noon of Saturday , December 21, to morning of 

Wednesday, January 1. 
1908. 
February 22 . . . Washington's Birthday : a holiday — Saturday. 
Vacation from noon of Saturday, March 28, to morning of Tuesday, 

April 7. 

May 30 ... . Memorial Day : a holiday — Saturday. 

June 10 to 24 . . Examinations — Wednesday to Wednesday of 

the second week following. 
June 24 . . . . Commencement Exercises of the Medical School 

10 A. M., Church — Wednesday. 

Summer Vacation of Seventeen Weeks. 



October 22 



Examinations begin — Thursday. 
6 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE was incorporated by the General Court 
of Massachusetts, upon the joint petition of the Association 
of Ministers and the Court of Sessions of Cumberland County. 
The act of incorporation was signed by Governor Samuel Adams, 
June 24, 1794. 

The college was named in honor of James Bowdoin, a grandson of 
the Huguenot refugee, Pierre Baudouin, who fled from the religious 
persecution that followed the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, and, 
in 1687, made a home for himself on the shores of Casco Bay, in what 
is now the city of Portland. In the next generation the family name 
was anglicized, and the grandson, James Bowdoin, was born in 
Boston, which had become the family home, and was graduated from 
Harvard College in 1745. 

He was a stanch and influential supporter of the movement for 
American independence, a member for many years of the Council, or 
senate, of the colonial legislature, a delegate to the first Continental 
Congress in Philadelphia, president of the Provincial Council, and a 
close personal friend of Washington. He was also the president of 
the convention which framed the Constitution of Massachusetts, and 
was, subsequently, for two terms Governor of the State. In addition 
to his civil honors he received honorary academic degrees from 
Harvard, from the University of Pennsylvania, and from the Univer- 
sity of Edinburgh ; he was a member of various foreign societies, the 
first president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a 
valued friend and correspondent of Benjamin Franklin. 

The earliest patron of the college was the Honorable James 
Bowdoin, son of the Governor. He was graduated from Harvard 
College in 1771, and subsequently studied at the University of Oxford. 
In President Jefferson's administration he was appointed successively 
Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of Spain, and Associate Minis- 

7 



Bowdoin College 

ter at the Court of France. During his residence abroad he accumu- 
lated a valuable library, a collection of paintings and drawings by old 
and modern masters, a cabinet of minerals and fossils, together with 
models of crystallography, all of which he bequeathed to the college. 
During his lifetime he gave land, money, and apparatus to the college, 
and at his death it became, by will, his residuary legatee. 

Circumstances delayed the opening of the college for several years 
after its incorporation ; but in 1802, a substantial brick building having 
been erected for its accommodation, the first president was inaugu- 
rated, and the work of instruction was begun. The college was 
established, and has been maintained, under the general patronage of 
the Congregational churches, but its instruction, government, and 
administration are, and have always been, unsectarian. The govern- 
ment of the college is vested in two concurrent Boards, the Trustees 
and the Overseers, and since 1870 one-half the vacancies occurring in 
the Board of Overseers have been filled from nominations by the body 
of the alumni. 

The Medical School dates from 1820, when it was incorporated by 
the first legislature of the new State of Maine, and made a department 
of Bowdoin College. 

At the Commencement of 1894 the one hundredth anniversary of 
the incorporation of the college was celebrated with appropriate exer- 
cises, and at that time the academical, medical, and honorary graduates 
numbered, together, four thousand three hundred and sixty-five ; and 
another thousand was made up of those who had studied in the college 
without taking a degree, and of those who were undergraduates in 
that anniversary year. 



8 



REGISTER 



^Trustees 

REV. WILLIAM DeWITT HYDE, D.D., LL.D., President, 

Bru?iswick. 
REV. JOHN SMITH SEWALL, D.D., Vice-President, 

Bangor* 
HON. JOSHUA LAWRENCE CHAMBERLAIN, LL.D., 

Brunswick. 
HON. WILLIAM PIERCE FRYE, LL.D., Washington, D. C. 
HON. WILLIAM LeBARON PUTNAM, LL.D., Portland. 

GEN. THOMAS HAMLIN HUBBARD, LL.D., New York City. 
GEN. OLIVER OTIS HOWARD, LL.D., Burlington, Vt 

HON. MELVILLE WESTON FULLER, LL.D. 

Washington, D. C, 
REV. SAMUEL VALENTINE COLE, D.D., Norton, Mass. 
EDWARD STAN WOOD, Litt.D., Brookline, Mass. 

HON. LUCILIUS ALONZO EMERY, LL.D., Ellsworth. 



IRA PEIRCE BOOKER, Esq., Treasurer, Brunswick. 



SECRETARY 
BARRETT POTTER, Esq., A.M., Brunswick. 

HON. CHARLES FREEMAN LIBBY, LL.D., President, 

Portland. 
GALEN CLAPP MOSES, A.M., Vice-President, Bath. 

II 



Bowdoin College 

REV. HENRY FISKE HARDING, A.M., HallowelL 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., LL.D., Brunswick. 

REV. JOTHAM BRADBURY SEWALL, D.D., 

Brookline, Mass. 
REV. EDWARD NEWMAN PACKARD, D.D., Stratford, 

Conn. 
DANIEL ARTHUR ROBINSON, A.M., M.D., Bangor. 

JAMES McKEEN, Esq., LL.D., New York. 

FREDERIC HENRY GERRISH, M.D., LL.D., Portland. 

HENRY NEWBEGIN, Esq., A.M., Defiance, Ohio. 

WILLIAM EDWARD SPEAR, Esq., A.B., Boston, Mass. 

JOHN LELAND CROSBY, A.M., Bangor. 

HON. CHARLES UPHAM BELL, LL.D., Andover, Mass. 
HON. JOHN BAKEMAN REDMAN, A.M., Ellsworth. 

JOHN ADAMS MORRILL, Esq., A.M., Auburn. 

SAMUEL CLIFFORD BELCHER, Esq., A.M., Farmington. 
REV. EDGAR MILLARD COUSINS, A.B., Thomaston. 

OLIVER CROCKER STEVENS, Esq., A.M., Boston, Mass. 
FRANKLIN AUGUSTUS WILSON, Esq., LL.D., Bangor. 
HON. ENOCH FOSTER, A.M., Portland. 

GEORGE COLBY PURINGTON, A.M., Farmington. 

HON. JAMES PHINNEY BAXTER, Litt.D., Portland. 

DANIEL CLARK LINSCOTT, Esq., A.M., Boston, Mass. 

CHARLES WESTON PICKARD, A.M., Portland. 

JOSEPH EUGENE MOORE, Esq., A.M., Tho7naston. 

HON. EDWIN UPTON CURTIS, A.M., Boston, Mass. 

REV. CHARLES HERRICK CUTLER, D.D., Bangor. 

FRANKLIN CONANT PAYSON, Esq, A.M., Portla?id. 

REV. CHARLES CUTLER TORREY, D.D., New Haven, Conn. 
GEORGE FOSTER CARY, Esq., A.B., East Machias. 

WILLIAM JOHN CURTIS, Esq., A.B., New York City. 

WESTON LEWIS, Esq., A.B., Gardiner. 

HON. WILLIAM TITCOMB COBB, LL.D., Rockland. 

12 



Committees of the Boards 

FREDERICK HUNT APPLETON, Esq., A.M., Bangor, 

CHARLES TAYLOR HAWES, Esq., A.B., Bangor. 

HON. CLARENCE HALE, A.M., Portland. 
HON. DE ALVA STANWOOD ALEXANDER, 

A.M., Buffalo, N. Y. 

ALFRED EDGAR BURTON, C.E., Boston, Mass. 

GEORGE PATTEN DAVENPORT, A.M., Bath. 

HON. ADDISON EMERY HERRICK, A.M., Bethel 

HON. LEVI TURNER, A.M., Portland. 

FREDERIC ALVAN FISHER, Esq., A.M., Lowell, Mass. 

SECRETARY 

THOMAS HARRISON RILEY, Esq., A.B., Brunswick, 



Committees of tlje JSoartrs 

VISITING 

Messrs. Cole, Stanwood, Belcher, Payson, and Alexander 

EXAMINING 

Messrs. Sewall, Chamberlain, Morrill, Torrey, 
Cutler, and Davenport. 

FINANCE 

Messrs. Putnam, Stanwood, Moses, and Crosby. 

HONORARY DEGREES 

Messrs. Libby (ex officio), Fuller, Hubbard, Chamberlain, 
Wilson, Stevens, and Burton. 

VACANCIES IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Messrs. Putnam, Frye, Robinson, and Herrick. 

13 



Bowdoin College 



VACANCIES IN THE COLLEGE 

Messrs. Hubbard, Emery, Bell, and McKeen. 

ART INTERESTS 

Messrs. Chamberlain and Baxter. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The Treasurer, with Professors Chapman and Robinson 

from the Faculty. 



©olleflr preachers 

i 906- i 907 

REV. ALEXANDER McKENZIE, D.D., 
REV. LYMAN ABBOTT, D.D., LL.D., 
REV. HUGH BLACK, A.M., 
REV. WILLIAM W. FENN, A.M., 



Cambridge, Mass. 

New York City. 

New York City. 
Cambridge, Mass. 



14 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND 
GOVERNMENT 



Rev. WILLIAM DeWITT HYDE, D.D.,LL.D., President Stone 
Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. *S$ Federal Street. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Internal Medi- 
cine and Dean of the Medical Faculty. 163 Maine Street. 

STEPHEN HOLMES WEEKS, M.D., LL.D., Professor Emeritus 
of Surgery. 662 Congress Street, Portland. 

CHARLES OLIVER HUNT, A.M., M.D., Professor of Materia 
Medica and Therapeutics. 321 Brackett Street, Portland. 

LUCILIUS ALONZO EMERY, LL.D., Professor of Medical 
furisprudence. Ellsworth. 

HENRY LELAND CHAPMAN, D.D., Professor of English 
Literature. 79 Federal Street. 

FREDERIC HENRY GERRISH, M.D., LL.D., Professor of 
Surgery. 675 Congress Street, Portland. 

LESLIE ALEXANDER LEE, Ph.D., Professor of Geology and 
Biology. 3 Bath Street. 

FRANKLIN CLEMENT ROBINSON, A.M., LL.D., Professor 
of Chemistry and Mineralogy and fosiah Little Professor of 
Natural Science. 214 Maine Street. 

HENRY JOHNSON, Ph.D., Longfellow Professor of Modern Lan- 
guages and Curator of the Art Collections. 256 Maine Street. 

CHARLES BRYANT WITHERLE, A.B., M.D., Professor of 
Neurology. 704 Congress Street, Portland. 

* The residence is in Brunswick, except as otherwise stated. 

is 



Bowdoin College 

FRANK EDWARD WOODRUFF, A.M., Professor of the Greek 
Language and Literature, Collins Professor of Natural and Re- 
vealed Religion, and Recorder of the College. 262 Maine Street. 

ALBERT ROSCOE MOULTON, M.D., Professor of Mental 
Diseases. Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane, Philadelphia, Pa. 

CHARLES DENNISON SMITH, A.M., M.D., Professor of Physi- 
ology. Maine General Hospital, Portland. 

GEORGE THOMAS LITTLE, Litt.D., Librarian. 

8 College Street. 

ADDISON SANFORD THAYER, A.B., M.D., Professor of 
Diseases of Children. 10 Deering Street, Portland. 

WILLIAM ALBION MOODY, A.M., Wing Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 60 Federal Street. 

JOHN FRANKLIN THOMPSON, A.M., M.D., Professor of 
Diseases of Women. 211 State Street, Portland. 

CHARLES CLIFFORD HUTCHINS, A.M., Professor of Physics. 

74 Federal Street. 

WILLIS BRYANT MOULTON, A.M., M.D., Professor of Oph- 
thalmology and Otology. 180 State Street, Portland. 

FRANK NATHANIEL WHITTIER, A.M., M.D., Director of the 
Gymnasium, Lecturer on Hygiene and Professor of Pathology 
and Bacteriology. 161 Maine Street. 

GEORGE TAYLOR FILES, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

238 Maine Street. 

EDWARD JOSEPH McDONOUGH, A.B., M.D., Professor of 
Obstetrics. 624 Congress Street, Portland. 

WILMOT BROOKINGS MITCHELL, A.M., Edward Little 
Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory. 6 College Street. 

ALLEN JOHNSON, Ph.D., Professor of History and Political 
Science. 88 Federal Street. 

, Daniel B. Fayerweather Professor of E co- 
no? nics and Sociology. 

WALTER EATON TOBIE, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

3 Deering Street, Portland. 

WILLIAM TRUFANT FOSTER, A.M., Professor of English 
and Argumentation. 72 Federal Street. 

KENNETH CHARLES MORTON SILLS, A.M., Wink ley Pro- 
fessor of the Latin Language and Literature. 31 Federal Street. 

16 



Officers of Instruction and Government 

FREDERICK WILLIS BROWN, Ph.D., Professor of Modem 

Languages. 80 Federal Street. 

ALBA M. EDWARDS, Ph.D., Acting Professor of Economics 

and Sociology. 262 Maine Street. 

HENRY HERBERT BROCK, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor 
of Clinical Surgery. 662 Congress Street, Portland. 

CHARLES THEODORE BURNETT, Ph. D., Assistant Professor 
of Psychology and Registrar of the College. 72 Federal Street. 

JAMES ALFRED SPALDING, A.M., M.D., Clinical Instructor 
in Ophthalmology and Otology. 627 Congress Street, Portland. 

HERBERT FRANCIS TWITCHELL, M.D., Instructor in 
Clinical Surgery. 10 Pine Street, Portland. 

GILBERT MOLLESON ELLIOTT, A.M., M.D., Demonstrator 
of Anatomy. 152 Maine Street. 

GUSTAV ADOLF PUDOR, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Der- 
matology. 134 Free Street, Portland. 

WILLIAM HERBERT BRADFORD, A.M., M.D., Instructor in 
Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 208 State Street, Portland. 

JAMES EDWARD KEATING, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Internal 
Medicine. 599 Congress Street, Portland. 

GILMAN DAVIS, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Nose and 
Throat. 604 Congress Street, Portland. 

ARTHUR SCOTT GILSON, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Surgery. 

117 State Street, Portland. 

RICHARD DRESSER SMALL, A.B., M.D., Demonstrator of 
Histology and Instructor in Obstetrics. 154 High Street, Portland, 

WILLIAM LEWIS COUSINS, M.D., Instructor in Clinical 
Surgery. 181 State Street, Portland. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, Jr., A.B., M.D., Instructor in Genito- 
urinary Surgery. Y. M. C. A. Building, Portland. 

EDVILLE GERHARDT ABBOTT, A.B., M.D., Clinical Instructor 
in Orthopedic Surgery. 14 Deering Street, Portland. 

W. BEAN MOULTON, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Diseases of 
Women. 690 Congress Street, Portland. 

WALLACE WADSWORTH DYSON, M.D., Instructor and Assist- 
ant Demonstrator of A nato?ny. 673 Congress Street, Portland. 

EDWIN WAGNER GEHRING, B.S., M.D., Instructor in 
Physiology. 690 Congress Street, Portland. 

2 17 



Bowdoin College 



FRED PATERSON WEBSTER, M.D., Instructor in Diseases 
of Children. 12 Pine Street, Portland. 

CHARLES HENRY HUNT, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Materia 
Medica. . 609 Congress Street, Portland. 

RALPH BUSHNELL STONE, A.M., Instructor in Physics and 
Mathematics. 234 Maine Street. 

HUDSON BRIDGE HASTINGS, S.B., Instructor in Surveying 
and Drawing. 69 Federal Street. 

THOMAS JAYNE BURRAGE, A.M., M.D., Assistant Demon- 
strator of Histology. 139 Park Street, Portland. 

GERALD GARDNER WILDER, A.B., Assistant Librarian. 

7 McKeen Street. 

CHARLES LANGMAID CRAGIN, M.D., Assistant Demonstra- 
tor of Anatomy. 929A Congress St., Portland. 

PHILIP PICKERING THOMPSON, A.B., M.D., Assistant 
Demonstrator of Anatomy. 298 Brackett Street, Portland. 



18 



Other Officers 



IRA PEIRCE BOOKER, Esq., Treasurer. 23 School Street. 

The office of the Treasurer is in Massachusetts Hall. 
Office hours : 9 to 12, 2 to 4 ; Saturdays, 9 to 12. 

SAMUEL BENSON FURBISH, B.S., Assistant to Treasurer. 

10 Cumberland Street. 

ISAIAH HACKER SIMF 'SON, Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds. 8 McKeen Street. 

LOUIS HEWITT FOX, A.B., Assistant in the Library. 

252 Maine Street. 
EDITH JENNEY BOARDMAN, Cataloguer. 2 High Street 

BELLE THWING ATHERTON, Assistant Registrar. 

4 School Street. 

CAROLINE TILLSON ROBINSON, Assistant Curator of the 
Art Collections. 256 Maine Street. 



19 



STUDENTS 



33ntrerflratmates 

SENIORS — Class of 1908 
Abbreviations : A. H., Appleton Hall; M. H., Maine Hall ; W. H., Winthrop Hall. 



Name 
Abbott, Charles Noyes . . 
Bagley, Edward Spaulding. 
Boyce, Joseph Michael . . 
Brigham, Herbert Storrs, Jr 
Chandler, Hiram Benjamin Tuell 
Coyle, Earl Howard . . . 
Delavina, Fred Valentine . 
Donnell, Murray Cushing . 
Fairclough, William Whitney 
Files, Charles Edward . . 
Gay, Thomas Edward . . 
Gould, Albert Trowbridge . 
Gray, Jay Lyman .... 
Ham, Arthur Harold . . . 
Hayes, Harry Herman . . 
Huse, Arthur Hosmer . . 
Hyde, George Palmer . . 
Leavitt, Sturgis Elleno . . 
Merrill, Maurice Palmer 
Pennell, Frederick Levi 
Purington, Harry Woodbury 
Putnam, Aaron Albert . . 
Ricker, Shipley Wilson, Jr. 
Robinson, Arthur Lincoln . 
Robinson, Carl Merrill . . 
Sanborn, Edward Talbot . 
Stanwood, Harold William 
Taylor, Russell Shephard . 



Residence Room 

St. John, N. B K. X House. 

Woodfords 21 W. H. 

Portland 15 W. H. 

Kennebunk .... ¥. T. House. 
West Sumner ... Z. ¥. House. 

Portland K. 2. House. 

Portlaftd K. 2. House. 

Houlton 24 College St. 

Richmond B. 0. n. House. 

Cornish ' 7 M. H. 

Auburn 20 A. H. 

Thomaston 21 M. H. 

Lubec 7 M. H. 

Liver more Falls . . . . 21 M. H. 

Bridgton A. T. House. 

Camden .... B. 0. n. House. 

Brunswick 7 A. H. 

Gorham K. 2. House. 

Skozvhegan . . . . Z. It. House. 

Portland 252 Maine St. 

Bethel 0. A. X. House. 

Houlton .... A. K. E. House. 
South Berwick . . 17 Cleaveland St. 

Brunswick 11 W. H. 

Portland 7 A. H. 

East Mac hi as 16 W. H. 

Rumford Falls . . . 38 College St. 
Skowhegan ...... I M. H. 



Students 



Name 
rimberlake, Philip Hunter 
Weston, Nathan Simmons 
Beaton, Chester Henry . . 



Residence 
Lancaster, N. H. 
Augusta . . . 
Richmond . . . 



Room 
. . 29 M. H. 
B. 0. n. House. 
. . 20 A. H. 



JUNIORS — Class of 1909 



Name 
Atwood, Harrison . . . 
Benner, Hervey Drowne 
Brewster, Ralph Owen . 
Bridge, Ezra Ralph . . 
Buck, George Henry . , 
Burton, Harold Hitz . . 
Clark, Ridgley Colfax (1908) 
Cole, Gardner Wilson . 
Cox, Neal Willis (1908) 
Cushing, Max Pearson . 
Dresser, Kenneth Howard 
Files, Ralph Henry . . 
Goodspeed, Ernest Leroy 
Harlow, Roy Clifford 
Harris, William Matthew 
Hayden, Wallace Hanson 
Heath, Gardner Kendall 
Hinckley, Walter Palmer 
Hiwale, Anand Sidoba . 
Hovey, Dudley .... 
Hughes, Arthur Wilder . 
Hurley, John Robert . . 
Jackson, Sumner Waldron 
Johnson, Edwin William 
Kilborn, Karl Bray (1908) 
Lee, Walter D. . . . 
Lowell, Herbert Gresham 
Marsh, Harold Newman 
Merrill, Raymond Earle 
Moulton, Albert Willis . 
Newman, Paul Jones 
Newton, Harry Jenkinson 
Parker, David Taylor (1908) 
Pennell, Robert Maxwell 
Phillips, Willard True . 
Pletts, Louis Oliver . . 



Residence 
Auburn . . 
Providence, R. I. 
Dexter .... 
Hampden . . 
Harrison . . 
West Newton, Mass 
Dexter . . . 
East Raymond 
Portland . . 
Bangor . . 
Roxbury, Mass 
West Gorham 
Randolph . . 
Richmond . . 
Lynn, Mass. . 
Bath . . . 
Augusta . . 
Hinckley . . 
Bombay, India 
Waldoboro . . 
Brunswick . . 
Oldtown . . 
Waldoboro . . 
Greenwich, Conn 
Portland . . 
Greenville, III. 
Westbrook . . 
Woodfords . . 
Conway, N. H 
Portland . . 
Fryeburg . . 
London, Eng. 
Bath . . . 
Brunswick 
Westbrook . . 
Brunswick 



Room 

0. A. X. House. 

0. A. X. House. 

A. K. E. House. 

A. K. E. House. 

A. T. House. 

A. K. E. House. 

. . 23 W. H. 

. . 29 M. H. 

¥. T. House. 

A. K. E. House. 

0. A. X. House. 

K. 5. House. 

, . . 18W. H. 

A. T. House. 

A. K. E. House. 

0. A. X. House. 

Z. V. House. 

A. K. E. House. 

. 26 W. H. 

. . . 27 M. H. 

. 29 Federal St. 

¥. T. House. 

, . . 27 M. H. 

. . 13 W. H. 

Z. If. House. 

A. K. E. House. 

K. 2. House. 

A. K. E. House. 

A. A. $. House. 

. 19 W. H. 

. . 26 A. PL 

50 Federal St. 

¥. T. House. 

7 Federal St. 

A. Y. House. 

16 Lincoln St. 



21 



Bowdoin College 



Name 
Pottle, Ernest Harold . . 
Pratt, Harold Sewall. . . 
Rich, Irving Lockhart . . 
Richardson, Clyde Earl 
Scates, Karl Desmond . . 
Shehan, Thomas Francis, Jr. 
Simmons, John Standish . 
Smith, Arthur Lawrence . 
Smith, Floyd Tangier (1908) 
Smith, Harold Merton . . 
Stahl, Jasper Jacob . . 
Stanley, Fred Veston . . 
Stanley, Oramel Henry . . 
Stetson, Rufus Edwin (1908) 
Stone, Carl Ellis .... 
Stubbs, Robert Goff . . . 
Sturtevant, James Melvin . 
Tefft, Kenneth Remington 
Timberlake, Leonard Fremont 
Voter, Perley Conant . . 
Wakefield, Leonard Foster 
Webster, Fred Patterson, M. D. 



Residence 
Farmington . 
Farmington . 
Portland . . 
Strong . . . 
Westbrook . . 
Portland . . 
New York City 
New Vineyard 
Brunswick 
East Barrington 
Waldoboro . . 
Lisbon . . . 
Love I I . . . 
Damariscotta 
Norway . . 
Strong . . . 
Dixfield . . 
Syracuse, N Y. 
Phillips . . 
West Farmington 
Bar Harbor . 
Portland . . 



Room 
A. T. House. 
A. T. House. 

. . . 8 W. H. 
A T. House. 

0. A. X. House. 

A. K. E. House. 
. . . 30 M. H. 
. A. T. House. 
. . 15 W. H. 

N. H. A. T. House. 
. . . 12 M. H. 
. . . Lisbon. 

B. 0. n. House. 
. 38 College St 
0. A. X. House, 
A. K. E. House 
0. A. X. House 
. . 12 W. H 
. A. K. E. House 

A. T. House 
0. A. X. House 
. . Portland 



SOPHOMORES — Class of 1910 



Name 
Ashworth, George Robert . 
Bailey, Merton Glenn Lewis 
Ballard, Harold Bearse . . 
Bower, Claude Oliver (1909) 
Boynton, Chester Alden 
Brown, Stuart Franklin 
Carter, Charles Frederick (1909) 
Cary, Charles Austin . . 
Colbath, Henry Jewett . . 
Crosby, John Leland, 2d . 
Crowell, Ralph Savage . . 
Deming, Clyde Leroy . . 
Eastman, Richard Raymond 
Edwards, Sumner .... 
Estes, Guy Parkhurst (1909) 
Evans, Frank Caradoc . . 
Farrar, Guy Wilbur . . . 



Residence Room 

Waldoboro 20 M. H 

Woodfords . . . B. 0. IT. House 

Gardiner K. 5. House 

Auburn .... A. A. 4>. House. 

North Whitefield . . . . 1 W. H. 

Whitinsville, Mass. . . . 29 W. H. 

Portland . . . . . . . 9 M. H. 

East Machias . . . A. K. E. House. 

Dexter A. K. E. House. 

Bangor 13 A. H. 

Bangor 13 A. H. 

Cornish Center, N H. . . 30 A. H. 
Fort Fairfield . . . . Z. V. House. 
Cambridge, Mass. . . . 12 W. H. 
Skowhegan . . . . B. 0. II. House. 

Camden 27 W. H. 

South Paris .... A. T. House. 
2 2 



Students 

Name Residence Room 

Farrin, Afton Holmes Pemaquid Harbor . . . . 30 A. H. 

Fisher, Ransom Edgar Ridlonville 23 W. H. 

Gastonguay, Thomas Amedeus (1909) Brunswick . . . A. K. E. House. 

Ginn, Thomas Davis (1909) . . . Roxbury, Mass. . . B 0. n. House. 

Guptill, William Stewart .... Gorham 17 W. H. 

Hale, Robert Portland ....... 28 M. H. 

Hawes, Henry Quinby Westbrook .... 0. A. X. House. 

Hill, Merrill Cristy Groveville {Buxton) . . . 29 W. H. 

Hobbs, Elmer Hamilton .... Waierboro .... B. 0. II. House. 

Hubbard, James Anthony .... Versailles, Mo 6 M. H. 

Ingersoll, Henry Gurney .... Auburn 23 A. H. 

Kane, Howard Francis (1909) . . Machias Z. ¥. House. 

Knight, Frank Willis Rockland 18 A. H. 

Leighton, Chester Adam (1908) . . Portland ¥. Y. House. 

Lippincott, Leon Stanley .... Augusta 16 A. H. 

McDade, Daniel Michael (1909) . Pawtucket, R. I. ... 31 W. H. 

Marsh, Harold Potter Sheldon, Vt. . . 0. A. X. House. 

Martin, Robert Burleigh .... Aicgusta .... A. K. E. House. 

Matthews, Edward Curtis, Jr. . . Portsmouth, N. H. . A. K. E. House. 

Messer, Robert Walcott, 2d. . . . Rockland .... B. 0. n. House. 

Mikelsky, Lewis Lee Bath 19 M. H. 

Morss, Philip Bray ton Medford, Mass 16 W. H. 

Morss, Robert Dillingham . . . Medford, Mass 8 M. H. 

Morton, Colby Lorenzo .... Friendship .... A. T. House. 

Newman, William Proctor . . . Bar Harbor . . . . 0. A. X. House. 

Nickerson, Parker Toward . . . Boothbay Harbor . . . . 25 M. H. 

Nulty, William Bridgham .... Buckfield 1 W. H. 

Otis, Ensign (1908) Rockland 15 W. H. 

Otis, Thomas New Bedford, Mass. . K. E. House. 

Peters, Clinton Noyes Portland ¥. T. House. 

Phelps, Thomas Cooley .... Willia7Jistown, Mass. . A. T. House. 

Pickard, Edward Temple .... Auburndale, Mass. . A. K. E. House. 

Pike, Harold Parker (1909) . . . Lubec Z. V. House. 

Powers, Paul Hussey (1908) . . . Houlton 24 College St. 

Robinson, Warren Eastman . . . Arlington, Mass. . A. A. 4>. House. 

Ross, Rodney Elsmore Kennebunk 24 M. H. 

Rowell, Harold Edwin Skowhegan 16 M. H. 

Russell, Henry Lowell Salem, Mass 14 A. H. 

Sanborn, William Harrison . . . Portland 22 M. H. 

Slocum, Harold Wilson .... Albany, N. Y. 18 M. H. 

Smith, Charles Albert West Medford, Mass. . . . 4 M. H. 

Smith, Leon Hartley Portland 0. A. X. House. 

Stone, Alfred Wheeler . . . . . Bangor A. K. E. House. 

Thompson, Ralph Lane .... Brunswick .... 29 Federal St. 

23 



Bowdoin College 



Name 
Tuttle, Raymond Anderson 
Walker, Charles William . 
Wandtke, Alfred Wilhelm 
Warren, Herbert Everett . 
Webster, Sereno Sewall 
Weeks, Harold Edward 
Weiler, Harold Charles (1908) . . 
Wentworth, John Alexander (1909) 
Williams, Thomas Westcott, . . . 

Wing, Earl Lytton 

Wing, Robert Fessenden .... 
Woodward, Harry Whiting . . . 



Residence Room 

Freeport 16 M. H. 

Skowhegan 10 M. H. 

Lewiston A. T. House. 

Woodsville, N. H. ... 3 W. H. 

Augusta B. ©. n. House. 

Fairfield 10 M. H. 

Houlton 11 Pleasant St. 

Portland 0. A. X. House. 

Houlton 8 A. H. 

Kingiield 14 M. H. 

East Machias 2 M. H. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. A. K. E. House. 



FRESHMEN — Class of 1911 



Name 
Allen, William Clinton . . 
Atwood, William Elbridge 
Aubery, Melville Cony . . 
Barton, George Sampson . 
Beal, Raymond Coombs 
Berry, Harrison Morton 
Bickmore, Harold Vincent 
Black, Fred Charles . . . 
Bradford, Robert .... 
Brown, Philip Haywood (1909) 
Burkett, Franz Upham . . 
Burnham, Harold Nichols . 
Burns, Frank Hastings . . 
Byles, Charles Hinckley 
Callahan, William Henry . 
Cartland, John Everett . . 
Chapin, William Harper . 
Chapman, Harrison Carter 
Clark, Lin wood Everett 
Clifford, William Henry 
Cole, Arthur Harrison . . 
Conway, Leon Tucker . . 
Curtis, John Libby . . . 
Davis, Frank Elmer Keefe . 
Davis, Joseph Albert (1908) 
Davis, Lawrence .... 
Dennis, Alonzo Garcelon . 



Residence Room 

St. Paul, Minn 9 A. H. 

Paris 15 M. H. 

Washington, D. C. ... 6 A. H. 

Auburn 28 A. H. 

Lisboii Falls 2 M. H. 

Gardiner 13 M. H. 

Augusta 28 W. H. 

Rockland 25 A. H. 

Wayne 14 W. H. 

Watertown, N. Y. . . V. Y. House. 

Union 3 A. H. 

Bridgton . . . .6 Cleaveland St. 

Bristol Mills 26 M. H. 

Central Village, Conn. . . 32 W. H. 

Lewiston 31 W. H. 

Lisbon Falls ... B. 0. IT. House. 

Saco 30 W. H. 

Portland . . . . A. A. 4». House. 

Wilton 29 A. H. 

Lewiston 6 W. H. 

Haverhill, Mass 11 A. H. 

Portland 17 M. H. 

Camden 27 W. H. 

Skowhegan 1 M. H. 

Westbrook 23 A. H. 

Bradford 25 W. H. 

Medford, Mass 32 A. H. 

24 



Students 

Name Residence Room 

Devine, John James Portland . . . . . . . 12 A. H. 

Dinsmore, Charles Walter .... Machias 30 M. H. 

Donnelly, Francis Thomas . . . Bangor 7 W. H. 

Draper, James Battles (1910) . . Canton, Mass. . . 0. A. X. House. 

Dreear, Samuel Herman .... Washington, D. C. . . Bath Road. 

Emerson, Walter Nelson .... Bangor 26 A. H. 

Fifield, Ernest Gibson Conway, N. H 5 A. H. 

Files, James Hoi den Portland 32 A. H. 

Fisk, Anthony Humphreys (1909) . Brunswick 1 Boody St. 

Foss, George Herbert (1908) . . . Fort Fairfield ... Z. ¥. House. 

Genthner, Sylvan Brooks .... Newcastle 14 W. H. 

Gibson, Arthur Collis Bangor .... A. A. *. House. 

Gibson, Algernon Tuttle .... Bangor 13 W. H. 

Gould, Melville Asher Oldtown 23 M. H. 

Grace, Ralph Boothby (1910) . . Saco 30 W. H. 

Haggerty, William Gardner . . . Webster, Mass 25 M. H. 

Haley, Orison Perkins Pop ham Beach 27 A. H. 

Hamburger, James Forbush (1910) . Hyde Park, Mass. . 0. A. X. House. 

Hansen, Harlan French (1910) . . Portland 16 A. H. 

Hansen, Philip Herman .... Portland 3 A. H. 

Hastings, Hugh Warren .... Fryeburg .... A. A. *. House. 

Hawes, Charles Boardman . . . Bangor 11 M. H. 

Hewes, Vyndel Arton Saco K . 2. House. 

Hichborn, Alden Sprague .... Augusta . . . ., . . . 12 A. H. 

Hill, Maurice Pierce Rockland 6 M. H. 

Hine, Harold Kirkham .... Dedham, Mass 19 A. H. 

Hine, Roderick Paul Dedham, Mass 19 A. H. 

Horsman, Read Clark Princeton 26 A. H. 

Howe, George Wilson Milo 21 W. H. 

Hussey, Stetson Harlowe .... Blaine Z. ¥. House. 

Hyler, David Scribner Rockland Z. ¥. House. 

Johnson, Alfred Wellington . . . Augusta 28 W. H. 

Johnson, Herman Adolph .... Bath 9 M. H. 

Kaulbach, George Chandler . . . Greenfield, Mass 29 A. H. 

Kellogg, Chester Elijah .... Melrose, Mass 21 A. H. 

Kendrie, Frank Estes (1910) . . . Ocean Park ... B. 0. II. House. 

Kern, Edward Eugene Woodfords 25 W. H. 

Kimball, Frank Alden (1910) . . Alfred 14 M. H. 

Kimball, Philip Horatio .... Gorham 17W.H. 

Koughan, Daniel Francis (1909) . Bath B. 0. II. House. 

Lawlis, Robert Merton Houlton 10 A. H. 

Lord, Fred Raymond Bath 27 A. H. 

Ludwig, Laurence Gorham (1910) . Houlton . . . . . Z. V. House. 

McFarland, Lawrence Portland 15 A. H. 

2 5 



Bowdoin College 



Name 
McGlone, Frank Bernard (1910) 
McKusick, James G. Blaine . . . 
McLaughlin, Harry Buddington (1916) 
Marston, Harold Percival 
Mathews, Percy Warren 
Merrill, William Folsom 
Meserve, Philip Weston 
Noyes, William Elton . 
Oxnard, Charles Lewis . 
Parkman, Lawrence Pratt 
Partridge, Ben Weston, Jr. 
Pearson, Keith Nelson . . 
Phipps, Benjamin Kimball 
Pierce, James Madigan . . 
Pierce, Stanley Woodard . 
Pope, Alton Stackpole . . 
Purington, Frank Humphrey 
Redfern, Donald .... 
Richards, Frank Pierce . . 
Roberts, John Leonard . . 
Robbins, Charles Dudley . 
Robinson, Clarence Perrin (1908) 
Robinson, Harrison Leonard 
Robinson, Ira Brown (1910) 
Sanborn, Oliver True 
Sanford, Gardner . . . 
Skelton, Edward Warren 
Skillin, Waldo Thompson 
Smith, Earl Baldwin . . 
Somes, Abraham Jacob 
S purling, Francis Benjamin 
Stephens, Winston Bryant 
Stetson, John Ara (1909) . 
Studley, Fuller Pierce (1909) 
Sullivan, Richard Wesley . 
Swan, Andrew Coburn . . 
Torsney, George Alexander 
Townsend, Frank Dunham (1910 
Waitt, Roland Hiram . . 
Watson, Horace Herbert . 
Weatherill, Edward Hacker 
Weeks, De Forest . . . 
White, Harold Sewell . . 
White, Joseph Curtis . . 



Residence Room 

Natick, Mass. ... A. T. House. 

Calais ,24 A. H. 

Williamstown, Mass. . . . 3 W. H. 

Lewiston 28 A. H. 

Lubec 31 M. H. 

Skowhegan 4 M. H. 

Portland 32 M. H. 

Topsham . . . . . . Topsham. 

West Medford, Mass. . . 31 A. H. 

Portland 8 W. H. 

Gardiner . . . . . . . 17 M. H. 

Providence, R. I. . . . . 20 M. H. 

Chelsea, Mass. ... K. 2. House. 

Houlton 10 A. H. 

Bath 9 W. H. 

Manchester . . . B. & n. House. 

Mechanic Falls 5 W. H. 

Swampscott, Mass 11 A. H. 

Bar Harbor 1 A. H. 

Brunswick ... 102 Pleasant St. 

Worcester, Mass 32 M. H. 

Portland K. 2. House. 

Bangor 11 W. H. 

Bath Bath. 

Portland 22 M. H. 

Boston, Mass . II M. H. 

East Brooksville . . . . 31 A. H. 

Hallowell 13 M. H. 

Brunswick . . . .50 Federal St. 

Mt. Desert 2 A. H. 

Northeast Harbor . A. K. E. House. 
New Bedford, Mass. . A. A. * House. 
Brunswick .... K. 2. House. 

South Portland 5 M. H. 

West Roxbury, Mass. . . 32 W. H. 

Princeton 15 M. H. 

Berlin, N. H 12 M. H. 

Brunswick .... 156 Maine St. 
Gardiner 18 W. H. 

West Med ford, Mass. . . . 5 W. H. 
Brunswick .... 34 School St. 

Cornish 5 A. H. 

Lewiston .... A. A. 4>. House. 
Bangor 9 W. H. 

6 



Students 



Name 
Whitmore, Harold Preble 
Wiggin, Harry Lawrence 
Wilson, Jesse Scott . . 



Residence Room 

Bar Harbor i A. H 

Boston, Mass 6 A. H. 

Concord, N. H. .... 2 A. H, 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Name Residence 

Baltzer, Melbourne Owen .... Steuben . . . 

Bishop, Percy Glenham Boothbay Harbor 

Caldwell, Wilbur Chamberlain . . Buckfield . . 

Clifford, John David Lewiston . 

Commins, Thomas Charles . . . Somerville, Mass. 

Crowley, William Robert .... Bangor . . . 

Davie, Harold Wheeler .... Hyde Park, Mass 

Hinkley, Harry Farrar ..... New York City 

Manter, John West Palmer, Mass. 

Merrill, Harry Clyde Portland . . 

Morrill, Berton Charles Augusta . . 

Palmer, Edward James Barnes . . Lanesboro, Mass. 

Percy, Sewall Watson Bath. . . . 

Readey, Daniel John Manchester, N. H. 

Richards, Alfred Perry Lynn, Mass. . 

Scamman, Clarence Linwood . . . Fairfield . . 

Sewall, Edgar Floyd Somerville, Mass. 

Smith, Ralph Woodward .... Augusta . . . 

Sparks, William Cone Bowdoinham . 

Stevens, Charles Leon Warren . . . 



A. K. 



Room 
50 Federal St. 
A. T. House. 
. . 1 W. H. 
. . 6 W. H. 
A. T. House. 
. . 7 W. H. 
. . 14A. H. 
. . 8 M. H. 
E. House. 
. . 19 W. H. 
17 Cleaveland St. 
. . . 18 A. H. 
. V. T. House. 
. . 31 W. H. 
. Z. Y. House. 
. Z. V. House. 
. A. Y. House. 
. Z. ¥. House. 
A. K. E. House 
. . . 26 W. H. 



Weston, George Cony . . . * . Augusta B. II. House 

Wight, Francis Pearl Rockland Z. "V. House 

Williams, Phillips Houlton 8 A. H 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Coons, Leroy Wilson, A. B. . . . Brunsiuick 
Pennell, Charles Melvin, A. B. . . Brunswick 



5 Lincoln St 
. 7 Page St. 



27 



Bowdoin College 



JHetrtcal <Sttttonts 



FOURTH YEAR 



Name 

Abbott, Henry Wilson 

Atwood, Harold Fisher . . . 
Bibber, Harold Thornton .... 
Bolster, William Wheeler, Jr., A. B. 
Buker, Edson Bayard, B. S. . . . 

Crane, James Wilder 

Foster, George Adams, A. B. . . . 
Geer, George Independence . . . 
Greene, John Adolph, A. B. . . . 

Hall, Herbert Wilder 

Hasty, Willis Leroy 

Jones, Arthur Leon, A. B. . . . ' . 
Marston, Henry Edward .... 

McKay, Roland Lee 

Mullen, Seth Smith 

Pettingill, Olin Sewall 

Potter, John Garfield 

Precour, George Charles .... 
Saunders, Henry Clayton, A. B. 
Sawyer, Samuel Edson, A. B. . . 

Staples, Ivan 

Stewart, Ralph Carroll, A. B. . . 
Stone, George Henry, A. B. . . . 
Twaddle, Widd Browne .... 
Tucker, George Everett, A. B. . . 
Whitney, George Burgess, A. B. 
Whitney, Harlan Ronello .... 
Williams, Edmund Percy, A. B. . . 
Woodruff, John Hamilton, A. B. 



Residence 

Wateiville 
Norwood, Mass, 
Bath . . . 
Auburn . . 
Waldoboro . 
Whiting . . 
Portland 
Westbrook . 
Rumford Falls 
Brooks . . 
Thomdike . 
Old Orchard 
North Anson 
Bowdoinham 
Vinalhaven 
Wayne . . 
Monticello . 
Saco . . . 
Portland 
Lewiston 
Limerick 
New Vineyard 
Portland 
Bethel . . 
Hyde Park, Mass 
Marlboro, Mass. 
South Windham 
Topsham . . 
Brunswick 



Room 

* 302 Brackett St. 

. 219 High St. 

18 Deering St. 

24 Arsenal St. 

280 Brackett St. 

336 Brackett St. 

. 174 Neal St. 

336 Brackett St. 

. 9 Wescott St. 

336 Brackett St. 

. 12 Oilman St. 

336 Brackett St. 

. 24 Arsenal St. 

336 Brackett St. 

302 Brackett St. 

849 Congress St. 

807 Congress St. 

807 Congress St. 

24 Arsenal St. 

17 Dow St. 

807 Congress St. 

302 Brackett St. 

16 Wescott St. 

128 Oxford St. 

. 174 Neal St. 

6 Congress Place. 

. 126 Winter St. 

135 William St. 

. 9 Wescott St. 



THIRD YEAR 



Name 



Residence 



Ball, Henry Whiting Mt. Desert Ferry 

Bunker, Willard Hiram .... Red Beach . . . 



Room 
568 Congress St. 
435 St. John St. 



* The room of Third and Fourth Year students is in Portland unless otherwise 
stated. 

28 



Students 



Name 

Cox, James Francis, A. B 

Cunningham, Charles Hunter, A. B. 
Curtis, Charles Leverett . . . . 
Higgins, Everett Clifton, A. B. . . 
Higgins, George I very . . . . . 

Usley, Harris Page 

Mabry, Irving Ellis, A. B 

Merrill, Walter Irving 

Murphy, John Luke 

Pendexter, Sidney Eugene .... 
Quinn, Hugh Francis, A. B. . . . 
Simmons, Clarence Raymond. . . 
Simonds, Otis Franklin, A. B. . . 
Thompson, Herbert Ellery, A. B. . 
Webber, Merlon Ardeen, A. B. . . 
Webber, Millard Carroll, A. B. 
Webster, Francis Howe, B. S. . . 
Whitmore, William Cotman, A. B. 



Residence 
Houlton . . 
Strong . . . 
Middle ton, Mass. 
Clinton . . . 
Clinton . . . 
Limington . . 
East Hiram . 
Portland . . 
Barllett, N. H. 
Portland . . 
Bangor . . . 
Appleton . . 
Portland . . 
South Portland 
Fairfield . . 
Fairfield . . 
Orland . . . 
Portland . . 



Room 
294 Brackett St 
20 Bramhall St 
568 Congress St 
280 Brackett St. 
280 Brackett St 
. 194 Grant St. 
. 89 Spruce St« 
435 St. John St. 
20 Bramhall St. 
561 Congress St. 
294 Brackett St. 
20 Bramhall St. 

. 82 India St. 

. . 13 C. St. 

. 174 Neal St. 

. 174 Neal St. 

9 Wescott St 
294 Brackett St 



SECOND YEAR 



Name 

Abbott, Percy Hobbs 

Anderson, Harry Edward .... 

Brown, Elmer Jonathan 

Bryant, Hannibal Hamlin, Jr., A. B. 
Carpenter, Lester Warren .... 

Deering, Charles Fuller 

Drummond, Joseph Blake, A. B. . 

Fahay, William Joseph 

Greene, Charles Harlow .... 

Hall, Leo Frederick 

Holt, Erastus Eugene, Jr., A. B. 
Humphreys, Ernest Davis .... 
Leighton, Adam Phillips, Jr. . . . 

Marshall, Linn Bayard 

Mikelsky, Frank, A. B 

Milliken, James Atwood Crowell 

Oram, Julius Calvin 

Russell, Blinn Whittemore, A. B. . 
Traynor, Charles Francis .... 
Valladares, Ricardo Geronimo . . 



Residence Room 

Water boro 44 Pleasant St 

South Limington . . 172 Maine St 

Strong 172 Maine St 

Waterville ... 6 Cleaveland St 
North Water boro . . 44 Pleasant St, 
Winslow's Mills . 6 Cleaveland St. 

Portland 38 College St 

Lewiston 84 Federal St 

North Bridgton . . .11 Pleasant St 

Augusta 64 Federal St 

Portland 38 College St. 

Henderson ... 6 Cleaveland St 
Portland ... 30 Cumberland St. 
Portland ..... 185 Maine St. 

Brunstoick 19 M. H. 

New Bedford, Mass. . 12 Everett St. 

Portland 234 Maine St. 

Farmington .... i85 Maine St. 
Biddeford . . 30 Cumberland St. 
Santa Clara, Cuba . . 234 Maine St. 



29 



Bowdoin College 



FIRST YEAR 



Name 
Bagley, Edward Spaulding 
Baldwin, Albert Kilburn, A. B. 
Clement, James Donald 

Conroy, James 

Dolley, Frank Stephen 
Giles, Ralph Waldo, A. B. 
Jackson, Elmer Herbert 
King, Elmer Henry . . . 
Lancaster, Arthur Linwood 
Lente, Harry Hallock . . 
Long, Paul Raymond . . 
Nason, Charles Jewell . . 
Ostergren, Christian Vilhelm 
Pritchard, Montague . . . 
Purinton, Royce Davis, A. B. 
Robinson, Carl Merrill . . 
Stanwood, Harold William 
Stetson, Rufus Edwin . . 
Taylor, Cornelius John . . 
Thewlis, Malford Wilcox . 
Tobey, Harold Grant, A. B. 
Weeks, Charles Delano 
Wharton, Charles Green . 
Wollin, Gustaf Fritz Robert 



Residence 
Woodfords 
West Paris 
Belfast . 
Portland . 
Portland . 
East Brownfield 
Jefferson . . . 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Richmond . . 
South Thomaston 
Parsonsfield 
Hampden . . 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Fall River, Mass 
Lewiston . . 
Portland . . . 
Rumford Falls 
Da?nariscotta . 
Bangor . . . 
Wakefield, R. I. 
Clinton, Mass. . 
Bath .... 
Los Angeles, Cal 



Room 

. . 21 W. H. 

io Harpswell PL 

3 M. H. 

5 Bath St. 

Everett St. 

5 Bath St. 

17 A. H. 

. 3 M. H. 

172 Maine St. 

6 Cleaveland St. 

10 Green St. 

10 Green St. 

Cleaveland St. 

17 A. H. 



17 



. . 7 A. H. 

28 College St. 

28 College St. 

84 Federal St. 

84 Federal St. 

1 1 Potter St. 

10 Harpswell PI. 

. 7 Everett St. 



Worcester, Mass. . 10 Cumberland St. 



3° 



Summary of Instructors and Students 



Summarfi trf Enstnutors antr Students 

INSTRUCTORS 

Academical Faculty 20 

Medical Faculty ..38 

Total .58 

Names counted twice .-..-. 4 

Total 54 

STUDENTS 

ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT 

Seniors 31 

Juniors 58 

Sophomores 73 

Freshmen .118 

Special Students . . . 23 

Graduate Students . . 2 

Total B . 305 

MEDICAL SCHOOL 

Fourth Year 29 

Third Year . . . a 20 

Second Year 20 

First Year 24 

Total 93 

Total 398 

Names counted twice 4 

Total in the Institution .......... 394 

3i 



Bowdoin College 



HONORARY COMMENCEMENT APPOINTMENTS 

Class of 1907 
Summa cum Laude 

Neal Woodside Allen Edward Carpenter Pope 

Charles Reynolds Bennett Malon Patterson Whipple 

Magna cum Laude 

George Allen Bovver William Shepard Linnell 

Arthur Chase Chadbourne Leon Dearborn Mincher 

Leroy Wilson Coons William Alexander Robinson 

Edward Augustin Duddy Charles Wilbert Snow 

Roscoe Henderson H upper Aubrey James Voorhees 

John William Leydon Harold Everett Wilson 

Cum Laude 
Felix Arnold Burton Seth Gurney Haley 

James Harold Collins Asa Osgood Pike 

Robert Alexander Cony Blinn Whittemore Russell 

Linwood Mandeville Erskine Frank Jones Weed 

PHI BETA KAPPA APPOINTMENTS 

Class of 1907 

George Allen Bower William Shepard Linnell 

Roscoe Henderson Hupper William Alexander Robinson 

John William Leydon Aubrey James Voorhees 

Class of 1908 

Herbert Storrs Brigham, Jr. Carl Merrill Robinson 

George Palmer Hyde Philip Hunter Timberlake 

John Franklin Morrison Chester Henry Yeaton 

32 



Appointments and Awards 

CLASS OF 1868 PRIZE SPEAKING 

Neal Woodside Allen Roscoe Henderson Hupper 

Edward Augustin Duddy Charles Wilbert Snow 

Seth Gurney Haley Aubrey James Voorhees 

BRADBURY PRIZE DEBATE 

Affirmative Negative 

Wadleigh Bean Drummond Phillips Kimball 

Roscoe Henderson Hupper Ammie Blaine Roberts 

Fulton Jarvis Redman Charles Wilbert Snow 

Alternates 

Arthur Lincoln Robinson William Shepard Linnell 

ALEXANDER PRIZE SPEAKING 

Albert Trowbridge Gould, 1908 Harold Hitz Burton, 1909 
John Franklin Morrison, 1908 Gardner Wilson Cole, 1909 
Harrison Atwood, 1909 Winston Bryant Stephens, 1910 

Ralph Owen Brewster, 1909 Alfred Wheeler Stone, 1910 

John David Clifford, Special 

AWARDS IN 1907 

Goodwin Commencement Prize. Roscoe Henderson Hupper 

Class of 1868 Prize. Charles Wilbert Snow 

Pray English Prize. Edward Augustin Duddy 

Brown Composition Prizes. Ammie Blaine Roberts, first prize ; 
Edward Augustin Duddy, second prize 

Alexander Prize Speaking. Alfred Wheeler Stone, first prize ; 
John David Clifford, second prize 

Sewall Latin Prize. John Robert Hurley 

Sew all Greek Prize. Fuller Pierce Studley 
3 33 



Bowdoin College 



Goodwin French Prize. John Leland Crosby, 2nd 

Noyes Political Economy Prize. Edward Carpenter Pope 

Smyth Mathematical Prize. Harold Hitz Burton 

Class of 1875 Prize in American History. Albert Trowbridge 
Gould 

Philo Sherman Bennett Prize. Arthur Lincoln Robinson 

Hawthorne Prize. Edward Augustin Duddy 

Bradbury Debating Prizes. Phillips Kimball, Ammie Blaine 
Roberts, Charles Wilbert Snow, first prizes; Wadleigh Bean Drum- 
mond, Roscoe Henderson Hupper, Fulton Jarvis Redman, second 
prizes 

Brow v n t Memorial Scholarships. Joseph B. Drummond, Class 
of 1907; Carl Merrill Robinson, Class of 1908; Thomas Francis 
Shehan, Jr., Class of 1909; Robert Hale, Class of 1910 

Charles Carroll Everett Scholarship. Malon Patterson 
Whipple 

Almon Goodwin Prize. Philip Hunter Timberlake 



34 



Degrees Conferred in 1907 



HBt&vttu (Konferretr in 1907 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Adams, Lester 
Allen, Neal Woodside 
Baldwin, Lorenzo Wilson 
Bass, Frank Lyman 
Bennett, Charles Reynolds 
Bower, George Allen 
Brown, Harry Leland 
Burton, Felix Arnold 
Buttrick, Paul Allen 
Carney, Richard Irving 
Chadbourne, Arthur Chase 
Chandler, Harold Beckles 
Collins, James Harold 
Cony, Robert Alexander 
Coons, Leroy Wilson 
Craigie, George William 
Doherty, Cornelius Francis 
Drummond, Joseph Blake 
Drummond, Wadleigh Bean 
Duddy, Edward Augustin 
Erskine, Linwood Mandeville 
Gannett, Frank Stinson 
Giles, Ralph Waldo 
Hacker, Tom Edgar 
Haley, Seth Gurney 
Hatch, Arthur Loud 
Holt, Erastus Eugene, Jr. 
Hull, George Herbert 
H upper, Roscoe Henderson 
Kimball, Phillips 
Kingsley, Chester Sumner 
Lawrence, Glenn Allan 

Winchell, 



Leydon, John William 
Linnell, William Shepard 
Mac Michael, Earle Haggett 
Mincher, Leon Dearborn 
Mitchell, Harry Edward 
Morrill, George Harold 
Pike, Asa Osgood 
Piper, Frank Sherman 
Pope, Edward Carpenter 
Redman, Fulton Jarvis 
Roberts, Ammie Blaine 
Roberts, Willis Elmer 
Robinson, D wight Stillwell 
Robinson, William Alexander 
Russell, Blinn Whittemore 
Sargent, Daniel 
Sawyer, Ralph Eugene 
Shorey, Philip Ricker 
Small, Ralph Millard 
Smith, Lewis Winfield 
Snow, Charles Wilbert 
Speake, William Eugene 
Stetson, Clarence Elbert 
Thomas, Charles Francis, Jr. 
Upton, Francis Robbins, Jr. 
Voorhees, Aubrey James 
Webber, Merlon Ardeen 
Webber, Millard Carroll 
Weed, Frank Jones 
Whipple, Malon Patterson 
Whitmore, William Cotman 
Wilson, Harold Everett 
Thomas Riley 

35 



Bowdoin College 

Out of Course 

Horace Malcolm Jordan (as of the class of 1858) 
Frederick Evans Lally (as of the class of 1882) 

MASTER OF ARTS 

William Stephen Brimijoin Roscoe James Ham 

Wilmot Brookings Mitchell 



DOCTOR OF MEDICINE 

Dolloff, Ernest David North, Charles David 

Everett, Harold Josselyn, A.B. Priest, Maurice Albert 

Foster, Ralph Waldo Ridlon, Magnus Gervise 

Keller, Benjamin Henry Rowe, William Thomas, A.B. 

Lewis, William Jerri's Sawyer, Alfred Loomis, A.B. 

Mason, Broadstreet Henry Sturgis, Karl Brooks 

Moore, Roland Banks Varney, Fred Lord 

Newcomb, Charles Howard Wyndham, Charles Arnold 



DOCTOR OF LAWS 

De Alva Stanwood Alexander (1870) Alfred Mitchell (1859) 

Clarence Hale 

DOCTOR OF DIVINITY 

Raymond Calkins William Henry Pierson (1864) 

DOCTOR OF LETTERS 

Isaac Bassett Choate (1862) 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Frank Edward Hanscom 

36 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

WILLIAM DeWITT HYDE, D.D., LL.D., President, and 

Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. 
HENRY LELAND CHAPMAN, D.D., Professor of English 

Literature. 
LESLIE ALEXANDER LEE, Ph.D., Professor of Geology and 

Biology. 
FRANKLIN CLEMENT ROBINSON, LL.D., Professor of 

Chemistry and Mineralogy. 
HENRY JOHNSON, Ph.D., Professor of French. 
FRANK EDWARD WOODRUFF, A.M., Recorder, and Pro- 
fessor of Greek. 
GEORGE THOMAS LITTLE, Litt.D., Librarian. 
WILLIAM ALBION MOODY, A.M., Professor of Mathematics. 
CHARLES CLIFFORD HUTCHINS, A.M., Professor of Physics. 
FRANK NATHANIEL WHITTIER, M.D., Director of the 

Gymnasium, and Lecturer on Hygiene. 
GEORGE TAYLOR FILES, Ph.D., Professor of German. 
WILMOT BROOKINGS MITCHELL, A.M., Professor of Rhet- 
oric and Oratory. 
ALLEN JOHNSON, Ph.D., Professor of History and Political 

Science. 
WILLIAM TRUFANT FOSTER, A.M., Professor of English 

and Argit7nentation. 
KENNETH CHARLES MORTON SILLS, A.M., Secretary 

of the Faculty, and Professor of Latin. 
FREDERICK WILLIS BROWN, Ph.D., Professor of Modern 

La7iguages. 
ALBA M. EDWARDS, Ph.D., Acting Professor of Economics and 

Sociology. 
CHARLES THEODORE BURNETT, Ph.D., Registrar, and 

Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
RALPH BUSHNELL STONE, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics 

and Physics. 
HUDSON BRIDGE HASTINGS, S.B., Instructor in Surveying 

and Drawing. 

39 



.>> 



Bowdoin College 



orommtttees of tije jFacultg 

Recording. — Professor Lee, Chairman ; Professors Moody, Wood- 
ruff, and Assistant Professor Burnett. 

Library. — Dr. Little, Chairman; Professors Chapman, H. John- 
son, Lee, and A. Johnson. 

Public Exercises. — Professor Robinson, Chairman; Professor 
Lee and Dr. Little. 

Music — Professor Woodruff, Chairman; Professor Chapman and 

Assistant Professor Burnett. 
Relations with Preparatory Schools. — Professor Foster, 

Chairman ; Professors Files, Sills, and Brown. 
Advisory Committee on Athletics. — Dr. Whittier, Chairman; 

Professor Hutchins. 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 
cSutJjecta in tofjttlj ISpamfuattons are ijeitr 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are examined in 
the following subjects : 



ENGLISH 

Preparation in English has two main objects: (i) command of 
correct and clear English, spoken and written ; (2) power to read 
with intelligence and appreciation. 

To secure the first end, training in grammar and the simpler 
principles of rhetoric, and the writing of frequent compositions are 
essential. The candidate must be able to spell, capitalize, and punctu- 
ate correctly. He must show a practical knowledge of the essentials 
of English grammar, including ordinary grammatical terminology, 
inflections, syntax, the use of phrases and clauses; a thorough training 
in the construction of the sentence ; and familiarity with the simpler 
principles of paragraph division and structure. 

40 



Admission 

To secure the second end, the candidate is required to read the 
works named below. The list is intended to give the candidate the 
opportunity of reading, under intelligent direction, a number of impor- 
tant pieces of literature. 

Reading and Practice. The candidate should read the works pre- 
scribed below with a view to understanding and enjoying them. He 
will be required to present evidence of a general knowledge of their 
subject-matter, and to answer simple questions on the lives of their 
authors. The form of examination will usually be the writing of a 
paragraph or two on each of several topics set in the paper given the 
candidate. The treatment of these topics is designed to test the 
candidate's power of clear and accurate expression, and will call for 
only a general knowledge of the substance of th-e books. In place of 
a part or the whole of this test, the candidate may present an exercise 
book, properly certified by his instructor, containing compositions or 
other written work done in connection with the reading of the books. 
The books for this part of the examination will be : 

For 1908. — Shakespere's " Macbeth/' and " The Merchant of 
Venice"; the " Sir Roger de Coverley Papers "in the Spectator; 
Scott's " Ivanhoe," and " The Lady of the Lake" ; Irving's u Life of 
Goldsmith"; Coleridge's " The Ancient Mariner"; Tennyson's 
" Gareth and Lynette," " Lancelot and Elaine," and " The Passing 
of Arthur " ; Lowell's " The Vision of Sir Launfal "; George Eliot's 
" Silas Marner." 

For 1909. — Shakespere's " The Merchant of Venice," and "Julius 
Caesar"; Bunyan's "The Pilgrim's Progress" (Part 1) ; the 
" Sir Roger de Coverley Papers " in the Spectator ; Scott's " The 
Lady of the Lake," and "Ivanhoe"; Irving's "Sketch Book"; 
Macaulay's " Lays of Ancient Rome " ; Tennyson's " Gareth and 
Lynette," " Lancelot and Elaine," and "The Passing of Arthur"; 
George Eliot's " Silas Marner." 

For 1910, 191 1. — Shakespere's "The Merchant of Venice," and 
"Julius Caesar"; the "Sir Roger de Coverley Papers" in the 
Spectator; Franklin's "Autobiography"; Scott's "The Lady of 
the Lake," and " Ivanhoe " ; Hawthorne's "The House of the Seven 
Gables"; Macaulay's "Lays of Ancient Rome"; Tennyson's 
" Gareth and Lynette," " Lancelot and Elaine," and " The Passing 
of Arthur " ; Dickens's " A Tale of Two Cities. " 

4i 



Bowdoin College 

The lists for the classes entering in 1909, 1910, and 191 1 are selected 
from the list adopted by the Conference on Uniform Entrance Require- 
ments in English, at a meeting held in Newark, N. J., February 22, 1905. 
That list may be found in the Bowdoin College Catalogue, 1 905-1 906 
(p. 41), or will be furnished on application to the College. Candidates 
may make other selections from that list provided that on or before 
the first day of February preceding the examination they give notice 
to the Registrar of the College of their intention to present these 
books. 

Study and Practice. — The candidate should read the books pre- 
scribed below with the view of acquiring such knowledge of their con- 
tents as will enable him to answer specific questions with accuracy 
and some detail. The examination is not designed, however, to re- 
quire minute drill in difficulties of verbal expressions, unimportant 
allusions, and technical details. 

For 1908. — Shakespere's "Julius Caesar"; Milton's "Lycidas," 
" Comus," " L' Allegro," and " II Penseroso " ; Burke's " Speech on 
Conciliation with America"; Macaulay's " Essay on Addison," and 
" Life of Johnson." 

For 1909, 1910, 191 T. — Shakespere's " Macbeth "; Milton's'* Lycidas," 
" Comus," " L' Allegro," and " II Penseroso " ; Burke's " Speech on 
Conciliation with America," or Washington's " Farewell Address," 
and Webster's " First Bunker Hill Oration " ; Macaulay's " Life of 
Johnson," or Carlyle's u Essay on Burns." 

MATHEMATICS 

I. Algebra. The requirement in Algebra embraces the following 
topics : All elementary processes necessary for the solution of simul- 
taneous equations of the first degree ; the statement and solution of 
problems leading to these equations ; treatment of inequalities ; doc- 
trine of square and cube root; theory of exponents; radicals and 
imaginaries ; solution of quadratics and equations in quadratic form 
by the method of completing the square, by factoring, and by a for- 
mula ; discussion of the properties of quadratics ; quadratics con- 
taining two unknown quantities, and the solution of problems leading 
thereto ; ratio and proportion ; arithmetical and geometric progres- 
sions ; binomial theorem for positive integral exponents. 

42 



Admission 

II. Plane Geometry. The requirement in Plane Geometry in- 
cludes the theorems and exercises of the ordinary school text-book; 
mensuration of plane figures ; and numerical problems based on the 
text. The candidate should be able to write formal demonstrations 
of simple original theorems. 

III. Advanced Algebra. The following subjects or their equiva- 
lents : Indeterminate equations, undetermined coefficients, binomial 
theorem, theory of limits, logarithmic series, solution of equations by 
synthetic division with necessary theorems, and graphs of quantics, 
with rational, or with not more than two irrational or imaginary roots. 

IV. Solid Geometry, as represented by the ordinary college text- 
books. Candidates must readily solve problems of solid mensuration 
and demonstrate original theorems which may be easily deduced from 
the text. 

V. Plane Trigonometry as represented by the usual text-books. 

Candidates must be familiar with the theory and use of six-place 

logarithmic tables. 

LATIN 

I. Elementary Latin. The examination will be adapted to the 
proficiency of those who have studied Latin in a systematic course of 
five exercises a week, extending through at least three school years. 
It will consist of two parts : 

(a) The translation at sight of simple Latin prose and verse. 

(d) A thorough examination on Cicero's second, third, and fourth 
speeches against Catiline, directed to testing the candidate's mastery 
of the ordinary forms, constructions, and idioms of the language ; the 
test to consist, in part, of writing simple Latin prose, involving the use 
of such words, constructions, and idioms only, as occur in the speeches 
prescribed. 

II. Advanced Latin. The examination will be adapted to the 
proficiency of those who have studied Latin in a systematic course of 
five exercises a week, extending through at least four school years. 
It will consist of two parts : 

(a) The translation at sight of passages of Latin prose and verse, 
with questions on ordinary forms, constructions, and idioms, and on 
prosody. 

(b) The translation into Latin prose of a passage of connected 

43 



Bowdoin College 



English narrative. The passage set for translation will be based on 
some portion of the Latin prose works usually read in preparation for 
college, and will be limited to the subject-matter of those works. 

The examinations, except as stated in Id above, will be directed 
to testing the candidate's knowledge of Latin, and his ability 
to read and understand the language rather than his knowledge 
of special works which he has studied. It is believed that a. 
course of four years with five lessons a week covering an 
amount equal to four books of Caesar, six orations of Cicero, 
and six books of Virgil's JEneid, together with practice in 
Latin composition and in reading at sight, will be sufficient to 
give the required proficiency. 

GREEK 

I. Elementary Greek. The examination will be adapted to 
the proficiency of those who, in addition to the course defined as suit- 
able preparation for the examination in Elementary Latin, have studied 
Greek in a systematic course of five exercises a week, extending 
through at least two school years. It will consist of two parts : 

(a) The translation at sight of passages of simple Attic prose. 

(b) A thorough examination on Xenophon's " Anabasis," Book II, 
directed to testing the candidate's mastery of the ordinary forms, 
constructions, and idioms of the language; the test to consist, in 
part, of writing simple Attic prose, involving the use of such words, 
constructions, and idioms only, as occur in the portion of Xenophon 
prescribed. 

II. Advanced Greek. The examination will be adapted to the 
proficiency of those who, in addition to the course defined as a suit- 
able preparation for the examination in Advanced Latin, have studied 
Greek in a systematic course of five exercises a week, extending 
through at least three school years. It will consist of two parts : 

(a) The translation at sight of passages of Attic prose and of 
Homer, with questions on ordinary forms, constructions, and idioms, 
and on prosody. 

(b) The translation into Attic prose of a passage of connected 
English narrative. The passage set for translation will be based on 

44 



Admission 

some portion of the Greek prose works usually read in preparation 
for college, and will be limited to the subject-matter of those works. 

The examinations, except as stated in lb above, will be directed 
to testing the candidate's knowledge of Greek and his ability to 
read and understand the language rather than his knowledge 
of special works which he has studied. It is believed that a 
course of three years with five exercises a week, covering four 
books of the Anabasis or their equivalent in Attic prose and 
2000 verses of Homer, together with practice in prose composi- 
tion and sight reading, will give the required proficiency. 

FRENCH 

The admission requirements in elementary and advanced French 
are those recommended by the Modern Language Association of 
America. 

I. ELEMENTARY FRENCH 

The first year's work should comprise : (i) careful drill in pronun- 
ciation ; (2) the rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the 
regular and the more common irregular verbs, the plural of nouns, 
the inflection of adjectives, participles, and pronouns; the use of 
personal pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions; 
order of words in the sentence, and elementary rules of syntax ; (3) 
abundant easy exercises, designed not only to fix in memory the forms 
and principles of grammar, but also to cultivate readiness in reproduc- 
ing natural forms of expression; (4) the reading of 100 to 175 duo* 
decimo pages of graduated texts, with constant practice in translating 
into French easy variations of the sentences read (the teacher giving 
the English), and in reproducing from memory sentences previously 
read ; (5) writing French from dictation. 

The second year's work should comprise : (1) the reading of 250 
to 400 pages of easy modern prose in the form of stories, plays, or 
historical or biographic sketches ; (2) constant practice, as in the 
previous year, in translating into French easy variations upon the 
texts read ; (3) frequent abstracts, sometimes oral and sometimes 
written, of portions of the text already read ; (4) writing French from 
dictation ; (5) continued drill upon the rudiments of grammar, with 
constant application in the construction of sentences ; (6) mastery of 

45 



Bowdoin College 



the forms and use of pronouns, pronominal adjectives, of all but the 
rare irregular verb forms, and of the simpler uses of the conditional 
and subjunctive. 

Suitable texts for the second year are : About, Le roi des montagnes; 
Bruno, Le tour de la France; Daudet's easier short tales; De la 
B£dolliere, La Mere Michel et son chat; Erckmann-Chatrian's 
stories ; Foa, Contes biographiques and Le petit Robinson de Paris ; 
Foncin, Le pays de France; Labiche and Martin, La poudre aux yeux 
and Le voyage de M. Perrichon; Legouve and Labiche, La cigale chez 
les fourmis ; Malot, Sans famille; Mairet, La tdche du petit Pie7're; 
Merimea, Colomba ; extracts from Michelet ; Sarcy, Le siege de Paris ; 
Verne's stories. 

II. ADVANCED FRENCH 

This should comprise the reading of 400 to 600 pages of French of 
ordinary difficulty, a portion to be in the dramatic form ; constant 
practice in giving French paraphrases, abstracts or reproductions from 
memory of selected portions of the matter read ; the study of a gram- 
mar of moderate completeness; writing from dictation. 

Suitable texts are : About's stories; Augier and Sandeau, Le Gendre de 
M.Poirier; Beranger's poems ; Corneille, Le Cid^ndi Horace; Coppee's 
poems; Daudet, La belle Nivernaise ; La Brete, Mon oncle et mon 
cure ; Madame de Sevignd's letters ; Hugo, Hernani and La chute ; 
Labiche's plays ; Loit, Pecheur d^Islande; Mignet's historical writ- 
ings; Moliere, Lavare and Le bourgeois gentilhomme ; Racine, 
Athalie, Andromaque, and Esther ; George Sand's plays and stories, 
Sandeau, Mademoiselle de la Seigliere ; Scribe's plays; Thierry; 
Recits des temps merovingiens ; Thiers, V expedition de Bonaparte en 
Egypte; Vigny, La canne dejonc; Voltaire's historical writings. 

GERMAN 

The admission requirements in elementary and advanced German are 
those recommended by the Modern Language Association of America. 

I. ELEMENTARY GERMAN 

The first year's work should comprise: (r) careful drill upon pro- 
nunciation; (2) memorizing and frequent repetition of easy colloquial 
sentences ; (3) drill upon the rudiments of grammar, that is, upon the 
inflection of the articles, of such nouns as belong to the language of 

46 



Admission 

everyday life, of adjectives, pronouns, weak verbs, and the more usual 
strong verbs, also upon the use of the more common prepositions, the 
simpler uses of the modal auxiliaries, and the elementary rules of syn- 
tax and word order ; (4) abundant easy exercises designed not only to 
fix in mind the forms and principles of grammar, but also to cultivate 
readiness in reproducing natural forms of expression ; (5) the reading 
of 75 to 100 pages of graduated texts from a reader, with constant 
practice in translating into German easy variations upon sentences 
selected from the reading lesson (the teacher giving the English), and 
in reproducing from memory sentences previously read. 

The second year's work should comprise : (1) the reading of 150 to 
200 pages of literature in the form of easy stories and plays ; (2) accom- 
panying practice, as before, in translating into German easy variations 
upon the matter read, also in the off-hand reproduction, sometimes 
orally and sometimes in writing, of the substance of short and easy 
selected passages ; (3) continued drill upon the rudiments of grammar, 
directed to the end of enabling the pupil, first, to use his knowledge 
with facility in forming sentences, and secondly, to state his knowl- 
edge correctly in the technical language of grammar. 

Stories suitable for the elementary course can be selected from 
the following list; Andersen, Marc hen and Bilderbuch ohne Bilder ; 
Arnold, Fritz auf Ferien ; Baumbach, Die Nonna and Der Schwie- 
gersohnj Gerstacker, Germelshausen ; Heyse, VArrabbiata, Das 
Madchen von Treppi, and Anfang und Ende ; Hillern, Hbher als 
die Kirchej Jensen, Die braune Erica; Leander, Traumereien and 
Kleine Geschichten ; Seidel, Marchenj Stokl, Unter dem Christ- 
baum ; Storm, Dnmensee and Geschichten aus der Tonne; Zschokke, 
Der zerbrochene Krug. 

The best shorter plays available are : Benedix, Der Frozess, Der 
Weiberfeind, and Giinstige Vorzeichen; Elz, Er ist nicht eifersiichtig ; 
Wichert, An der Majorsecke ; Wilhelmi, Ei7ier muss heiraten. 
Only one of these plays need be read, and the narrative style 
should predominate. A good selection of reading matter for the 
second year would be Andersen, Marchen, or Bilderbuch, or 
Leander, Traumereien, to the extent of about forty pages. After- 
ward, such a story as Das kalte Herz, or Der zerbrochene Krug; 
then Hbher als die Kirche, or Immensee ; next a good story by 
Heyse, Baumbach, or Seidel ; lastly Der Frozess. 

47 



Bowdoin College 



II. ADVANCED GERMAN 

The work should comprise, in addition to the elementary course, 
the reading of about 400 pages of moderately difficult prose and 
poetry, with constant practice in giving, sometimes orally and some- 
times in writing, paraphrases, abstracts, or reproductions from mem- 
ory of selected portions of the matter read ; also grammatical drill 
upon the less usual strong verbs, the use of articles, cases, auxiliaries 
of all kinds, tenses and modes (with especial reference to the infinitive 
and subjunctive), and likewise upon word order and word formation. 

Suitable reading matter for the third year can be selected from 
such works as the following : Ebner-Eschenbach, Die Freiherren von 
Gemperlein ; Freytag, Die Joumalisten and Bilder aus der deutschen 
Vergangenheit, for example Karl der Grosse, Aus den Kreuzziigen, 
Doktor Luther, Aus dein Staat Friedrichs des Grossen ; Fouque, Un- 
dine ; Gerstacker, Irrfahrten ; Goethe, Hermann und Dorothea and 
Iphigenie; Heine's poems and Reisebilder ; Hoffman, Historische 
Erzdhlungen ; Lessing, Minna von Barnhelm; Meyer, Gustav A do If s 
Page ; Moser, Der Bibliothekar ; Riehl, Novellen, for example Burg 
Neideck, Der Fluch der Schonheit, Der stutnme Ratsherr, Das Spiel- 
mannskind; Rosegger, Waldheimat ; Schiller, Der Neffe als Onkel, 
Der Geisterseher, Wilhehn Tell, Die Jungfrau von Orleans, Das 
Lied von der Glocke, Balladen ; Scheffel, Der Trompeter von Sak~ 
kinge?t ; Uhland's poems ; Wildenbruch, Das edle Blut A good se- 
lection would be: (1) one of RiehPs novelettes; (2) one of Freytag's 
" pictures " ; (3) part of Undine or Der Geisterseher ; (4) a short 
course of reading in lyrics and ballads ; (5) a classical play by Schil- 
ler, Lessing, or Goethe. 

CHEMISTRY 

General chemistry as represented by Remsen's " Introduction to 
Chemistry " or some other text-book of similar scope. Candidates 
must present note-books, certified by their instructors, in which are 
the results of their own experiments and full notes of processes; and 
not less than one-half of the time spent upon chemistry must have 
been given to laboratory work. 

48 



Admission 



PHYSICS 

Physics as represented by Gage's "Elements of Physics " or other 
text-book of equal grade. Candidates must be able to solve numeri- 
cal examples under the various sections ; must have performed forty 
experiments from Hall and Bergen's text-book, and have kept a note- 
book containing a written description in their own language of their 
experiments, with all their calculations. These note-books must be 
certified by their instructors and presented at the examination. 

HISTORY (INCLUDING HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY) 

I. Greek History. To the death of Alexander with due reference 
to Greek life, literature, and art. 

II. Roman History. To 8oo a.d. with due reference to govern- 
ment and institutions. 

III. English History. With special reference to social and 
political development. 

IV. American History. With special attention to the develop- 
ment of institutions and principles of civil government. 

The examinations in these subjects will call for comparison of his- 
torical characters and periods, for summaries of institutional develop- 
ment, and in general for exercise of judgment as well as memory. A 
knowledge of historical geography, which will be tested by an outline 
map, is essential. The amount of collateral reading which has been 
done by the student will be taken into consideration. In general, all 
schools are urged to take steps to make their courses conform as far 
as possible to the recommendations of the Committee of Seven. 



&tvmn of snrmtsston 

The subjects which have been mentioned in the previous pages may 
be presented in satisfaction of the requirements for admission to the 
Freshman Class in Bowdoin College under the following conditions. 
The basis of the system is the work represented by a course pursued 
five hours per week for a period of thirty-eight weeks. Such a course 
counts two points. 

a 49 



Bowdoin College 

I. A candidate for admission must offer subjects amounting in all 
to 28 points. 

II. The following subjects aggregating 22 points are required: 

English 6 

Latin 8 

Algebra 4 

Plane Geometry 2 

Roman History 1 

Greek, English, or American History . . . . 1 



22 



III. Subjects amounting to 
following list : 

Greek, Elementary . 
Greek, Advanced 
French, Elementary 
French, Advanced . 
German, Elementary 
German, Advanced . 
Chemistry .... 



6 points must be elected from the 



Physics . . . 
Advanced Algebra 
Solid Geometry 
Trigonometry . 
Greek History . 
American History 
English History 



IV. If Elementary Greek is not presented, the candidate for ad- 
mission must offer either Elementary French or Elementary German. 

In June 1909 and thereafter 1 point will be added to the require- 
ments in the list of options, 7naking a total of 29. 



jWetfjcrtra of ^irmtsstoii 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

The regular examinations for admission to college will be held 
in Banister Hall, in Brunswick, on Thursday, Friday, and Satur- 
day, June 25, 26, and 27, 1908, and on Monday, Tuesday, and 
Wednesday, September 21, 22, and 23, 1908. At the examinations 
in June, attendance is required at 1.30 p.m. on Thursday. At the 
examinations in September, attendance is required at 1.30 p.m. on 
Monday. The examinations are chiefly in writing. The schedule 
for the examinations of either period will be sent on application. 

5° 



Admission 

Examinations at Preparatory Schools. Printed examina- 
tion papers in certain of the subjects required for admission to college 
will be furnished to the principal of any high school or academy of 
good standing, having a regular college preparatory course of not less 
than three years in length, for the use of such of his students as 
propose to join the Freshman class at Bowdoin. In exceptional 
cases, the conduct of the examinations may, on the recommendation 
of the principal, be entrusted to some other person approved by the 
Faculty. 

The following are the subjects in which papers will be sent : I, Eng- 
lish ; 2, Elementary Greek ; 3, Advanced Greek ; 4, Elementary Latin ; 
5, Advanced Latin (two papers) ; 6, Algebra ; 7, Plane Geometry ; 
8, Elementary French; 9, Advanced French; 10, Elementary Ger- 
man ; 1 1, Advanced German ; 12, Roman History ; 13, Greek History; 
14, English History; 15, American History. 

On each of the above subjects, except Advanced Latin, one paper is 
sent. In Advanced Latin there are two papers (Parts I and II), the 
second of which consists of Latin Composition. 

No papers will be sent in either Advanced Mathematics, Chemistry, 
or Physics. The entrance examinations in these subjects can be 
taken only at Brunswick. 

In holding entrance examinations elsewhere than in Brunswick, 
the following regulations are to be observed: 

1. Papers are sent only in June. The dates for holding the exam- 
inations this year are June 11, 12, and 13. Under no circumstances 
can papers be sent at any other dates, 

2. Applications for papers, addressed to the Registrar, must be 
received not later than June 8 and should state the name of the 
school, the subjects in which papers are desired, and the number of 
students to be examined in each subject. 

3. Printed examination papers, together with the requisite number 
of blue-books, will be sent to the principal by express, prepaid, in time 
for the examination. On the completion of the examination, the books 
are to be returned at once by express, at the expense of the college. 

4. The examinations are to be conducted by the principal in con- 
formity with a schedule of hours fixed by the college. Copies of the 
schedule can ordinarily be obtained by May 15, on application to the 
Registrar. 

Examinations are also held at Thornton Academy, Saco: at 

5i 



Bowdoin College 



Washington Academy, East Machias; at Fryeburg Academy; and 
at Lincoln Academy, Newcastle, these schools having been made 
special fitting schools for the college by the action of their several 
Boards of Trustees, in concurrence with the Boards of Trustees and 
Overseers of the college. 

The entrance examinations may, if the candidate prefers, be divided 
between two or more successive years, or between June and Sep- 
tember of the same year. In that case a certificate will be given for 
such subjects as are passed at each examination. 

A report of the results of the examinations, whether at Brunswick 
or elsewhere, is made to the principal, and also to the candidate, 
within two weeks after Commencement. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

In place of examinations, certificates will be received from prepara- 
tory schools in New England which have been approved by the New 
England College Entrance Certificate Board. This Board is an 
association of colleges established for the purpose of receiving, 
examining, and acting upon all applications of schools in New Eng- 
land which ask for the privilege of certification. The associated 
colleges are Amherst, Boston University, Bowdoin, Brown, Dart- 
mouth, Mount Holyoke, Smith, Tufts, the University of Maine, 
Wellesley, and Williams. Certificates are in all cases passed upon 
by the individual college ; but students are received on certificate 
from such schools only as have been approved by this Board. All 
schools desiring the certificate privilege should apply before April \st 
of each year to the Secretary of the Board, Professor Nathaniel F. 
Davis, 159 Brown Street, Providence, R. I. Blank certificates for 
admission to Bowdoin College may be had on application to the 
Registrar. 

The certificates, issued as the result of examinations, which are held 
by the College Entrance Examination Board, will be accepted in so far 
as they meet the requirements for admission to Bowdoin College. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, Junior and Senior 
classes, who do not present certificates from other colleges, are 
examined in the studies already pursued by the class which they 
wish to enter, equivalents being accepted for the books and authors 

52 



Required and Elective Studies 

studied by the class. No one is admitted to the Senior Class after 
the beginning of the second semester. Applications for admission to 
advanced standing should be addressed to the Chairman of the 
Recording Committee (see p. 40). 

TESTIMONIALS AND CERTIFICATES 

Testimonials of good moral character must in all cases be pre- 
sented before tickets of admission are granted. A testimonial is 
preferred from the teacher under whom the preparatory course was 
completed. A student from another college, before he can be ad- 
mitted, must present a certificate of honorable dismissal. 

BOND 

A bond for two hundred dollars, with satisfactory sureties, must 
be filed with the Treasurer by every student on his admission to 
college, as security for the payment of his term bills and any other 
charges that may arise under the college laws. A blank form for 
this purpose will be given with the ticket of admission. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Persons who give evidence of maturity, earnestness of purpose, 
and adequate preparation will be allowed to pursue special studies 
in connection with the regular classes, without becoming matriculated 
members of the college. Applications for admission as special stu- 
dents should be addressed to the Chairman of the Recording Com- 
mittee (see p. 40). 



a&egttfretr antr ISlecttfae StuTrtes 

REQUIRED STUDIES 

In the Freshman year the following courses are required of all 
students: English 1, 2, French 1, 2 (or German 1, 2), Hygiene 1 
(1st Semester), and English 5 (2d Semester). In case a student 
offers both Elementary French and Elementary German for admis- 
sion, an elective may be substituted in place of the required language. 

In the Sophomore year, German is required of all students except 
those who offer either French or German (or both) for admission. 

53 



Bowdoin College 



Credits in both Elementary French and Elementary German, 
obtained either at entrance to college or for college courses, are re- 
quired for a degree. When no modern language is offered for admis- 
sion French is ordinarily studied first in college. 

In addition, a course in Physical Training is required of all students 
from December first to April first in each of the four years. 

ELECTIVE STUDIES 

All other courses, except those mentioned above, are elective, but 
subject to the following restrictions : 

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE ELECTION OF 

STUDIES 

1. All students, both Regular and Special, are required to take four 
(4) full courses in each Semester in addition to the required work in 
Physical Training and Hygiene. 

2. All Regular students are required to take a fifth (5) course dur- 
ing any two (2) Semesters after Freshman year. 

3. No student is allowed to elect more than one (1) extra course in 
any Semester, without the consent of the Faculty. 

4. No student is allowed to elect courses involving a conflict of 
hours, except with consent of the Faculty. 

5. Each student is required to arrange his course of study in con- 
formity with the following requirements in regard to Major and Minor 
Subjects. 

Definition. A Major is a subject pursued through six (6) courses. 
A Minor is a subject pursued through four (4) courses. 

6. Each Regular student is required to have completed before 
graduation either 

I. One major and two minor subjects, or 

II. Two major subjects. 

SCHEDULE OF FRESHMAN COURSES 

Note. The variety of subjects that may be offered in fulfilment of 
the requirements for admission necessitates the division of students 

54 



Required and Elective Studies 

into two groups, which in the following schedule of courses and in 
the description of courses of instruction are designated as follows : 
Class I. Candidates for the degree of A.B. who offer Greek for 

admission. 
Class II. Candidates for the degree of A.B. who offer other subjects 

than Greek for admission. 

Class I. 

(The numeral in parentheses indicates the number of hours per week.) 

Required Subjects : Hygiene (i) First Semester, English 5 (1) Second 
Semester, English 1, 2 (4), and French 1, 2 (4), or German 1, 

2(4). 

Elective Subjects: Choose two of the following: Mathematics 1, 2 
(4), Latin 1, 2 (4), Greek 1, 2 (4), History 1, 2 [or 3, 4] (3) 
under conditions. 

Class II. 

Required Subjects: Hygiene (1) First Semester, English 5 (1) 
Second Semester, English 1, 2 (4), and German 1, 2 (4), or 
French 1, 2 (4). 

In case a candidate offers both French and German, an elective 
may be substituted in place of the required language. 

Elective Subjects : Choose one from the following : Mathematics, 1, 2 
(4); Latin 1, 2 (4); and one of the following : Greek A, B (4), 
French 5, 6 (3) ; Physics 1, 2 (3), Latin 1, 2 (4), or Mathematics 
I, 2 (4), History 1, 2 [or 3, 4] (3) under conditions. 

Those who elect Physics 1, 2 in Freshman year must also elect 
Mathematics 1, 2; and those who elect Physics 1, 2 in Sopho- 
more year must have taken Mathematics 1, 2 in the Freshman 
year. 

Elective Subjects for those who offer both Elementary and Advanced 
German for admission ; Choose one of the following ; Mathe- 
matics 1, 2 (4), Latin 1, 2 (4) ; and one of the following: Greek 
A, B, (4), Physics 1, 2 (3), Latin 1, 2 (4), Mathematics 1, 2 (4), 
German 3, 4 (3), or History 1, 2 [or 3, 4 in alternate year] (3). 

55 



Bowdoin College 



(touxutz of Knstrttcttou 

GREEK 

Professor Woodruff 

A. Bennerand Smyth's "Beginner's Greek Book." First Semester : 
four hours, at the convenience of instructor and students. 

B. Xenophon's "Anabasis," with exercises in writing Greek; 
Homer's " Iliad," and a study of Homeric forms. A continuation of 
Course A. Second Semester at the same hours. 

Courses A, B are elective for all who enter college without 
Greek, and are a preparation for the Freshman courses. They 
will be omitted whenever there are fewer than three applicants. 

i. Homer's " Odyssey," with written translations and essays, and 
study of the life and art of the Homeric age ; followed by selections 
from Xenophon (" Memorabilia " or " Cyropaedia ") or Herodotus. 
First Semester: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 1.30. 

2. Selections from Xenophon or Herodotus continued ; followed 
by the Gospel of Mark, with study of the life and institutions of Pal- 
estine in New Testament times. Second Semester : Monday, Tues- 
day, Thursday, Friday, 1.30. 

Courses 1, 2 are elective for Freshmen, Class I, and all who 
have completed Courses A, B. 

3. Introduction to Dramatic Poetry, with study of the origin and 
development of the Greek drama and the construction and usages of 
the Greek theatre, together with the reading of one or more of the 
following plays : Euripides, " Alcestis," " Medea," " Hippolytus," and 
" Iphigenia in Tauris; " in alternation with the Lyric Poets, First 
Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9.30. 

4. Dramatic Poetry continued. Two or more of the following 
plays will be read : Sophocles, " Antigone," and " Oedipus the King ; " 
the " Agamemnon," and " Prometheus Bound " of Aeschylus ; the 
" Frogs," and " Clouds " of Aristophanes ; in alternation with Lysias. 
Second Semester : Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9.30. 

Courses 3, 4 are elective for students who have taken Courses 
I, 2. 

56 



Courses of Instruction 

5. Plato's " Apology " and u Crito," with selected passages from the 
" Phaedo " and other dialogues; in alternation with Aeschylus and 
Aristophanes. First Semester : three hours, at the convenience of 
instructor and students. 

6. Demosthenes. " De Corona," with the history of the development 
of Greek oratory ; in alternation with Thucydides and Lucian. Second 
Semester : three hours, at the convenience of instructor and students. 

Courses 5, 6 are elective for students who have taken 
Courses 3, 4. These courses may be elected for two suc- 
cessive years. 

7. Greek Literature in English Translation. Lectures and read- 
ings, with assignment of selected works for special study and fort- 
nightly written tests. After a general introduction, including a rapid 
review of the Epic period, the main work of the course will be in 
Lyric Poetry and the development of Tragedy from the " Suppliants " 
of Aeschylus to the " Bacchae " of Euripides. First Semester: 
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9.30. 

8. Continuation of Course 7. Second Semester, at the same hours 
Aristophanes, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, and Demosthenes. 

Courses 7 and 8 are elective for Seniors and Juniors. 



LATIN 

Professor Sills 

1. Introduction to Latin Prose Literature. Selections from Livy, 
Cicero, and Pliny the Younger. First Semester: four hours a week. 
Div. A, Tuesday, 11.30, Wednesday, 10.30, Thursday and Saturday, 
9.30. Div. B, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, 10.30. 

Elective for Freshmen. 

2. Introduction to Latin Poetry. Horace, Odes and Epodes ; 
Terence, one play. Second Semester : four hours a week. Hours, 
as in Course 1. 

Elective for Freshmen. 

Pre-requisite, except in special cases, Course 1. 

57 



Bowdoin College 

3. General View of Roman Comedy. Terence, three plays; Plautus, 
three plays. First Semester : three hours a week. Monday, Tues- 
day, and Thursday, 8.30. 

Elective for Sophomores. 
Pre-requisite, Courses 1, 2. 

4. General View of Latin Prose Literature, especially Tacitus. 
Second Semester : three hours a week. Hours, as in Course 3. 

Elective for Sophomores. 
Pre-requisite, Courses 1, 2. 

5. General View of Latin Tragedy. Fragments of the early tragic 
poets and selected plays of Seneca. First Semester : two hours a 
week, at the convenience of instructor and students. 

Elective for Seniors and Juniors. 
Pre-requisite, four courses in Latin. 

6. Lucretius. Second Semester : two hours a week, at the con- 
venience of instructor and students. 

Elective for Seniors and Juniors. 

7. Virgil. The Aeneid of Virgil will be read entire ; and the lec- 
tures will discuss Virgil as an epic poet and Virgil's literary influ- 
ence, particularly on English poets. Second Semester : three hours 
a week, at the convenience of instructor and students. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. This course 
may be taken by students who have not elected Latin in col- 
lege, and is recommended to all those who intend to teach 
Latin in preparatory schools. 

In 1908-9 other courses will be substituted for Courses 4, 5, 
and 6. 



FRENCH 

Professor Henry Johnson; Professor Brown 

1. Grammar, composition, and reading of simple texts. First 
Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Div. A, 8.30; Div. B, 9.30. 

58 



Courses of Instruction 

2. Grammar, composition, and reading of modern prose. Second 
Semester : Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Div. A, 8.30; Div. B, 9.30. 

Professor Brown 

Courses 1, 2 are required of all Freshmen and other first- 
year students who have not received credit in Elementary 
French for admission. 

3. Modern French Prose. DictationSo Special study of pro- 
nunciation, and of the principles of French syntax. Written reports 
on assigned outside readings. First Semester: Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday. Div. A, 9.30 ; Div. B, 10.30. 

4. Continuation of Course 3. Second Semester, at the same hours. 

Professor Johnson 

Courses 3, 4 are open to students who have passed in Courses I, 
2, or who have done equivalent work previous to admission to 
college. 

5. Literature up to the Seventeenth Century, in modern French 
versions, beginning with " La Chanson de Roland," ed. Geddes; ex- 
tracts from old French literature in the manuals of G. Paris ; the 
Sixteenth Century, concluding with essays of Montaigne. First 
Semester: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 11.30. 

6. Continuation of Course 5. Second Semester, at the same hours. 

Professor Johnson 

Course 5 and later courses are open only to students who have 
taken two years work in French in college, or its equivalent. 
Written reports on assigned outside reading are required as im- 
portant parts of all courses offered in French Literature. 

[7. Literature and literary criticism of the Nineteenth Century, 
Chateaubriand to Rostand. First Semester : Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday, it. 30.] 

[8. Continuation of Course 7. Second Semester, at the same hours.] 
Omitted in 1907-1908. To be given in 1 908-1 909. 

[9. Literature and literary criticism of the Eighteenth Century, 
Lesage to Chenier. First Semester: Monday, Wednesday, and 
Friday, it. 30. 

[10. Continuation of Course 9. Second Semester, at the same hours.] 
Omitted in 1 907-1 908. 

59 



Bowdoin College 

[n. Literature and literary criticism of the Seventeenth Century, 
classical period from Corneille to Fenelon. Dictations. Written 
reports on outside readings. First Semester : Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday, 11.30.] 

[12. Continuation of Course 11. Second Semester, at the same 
hours.] Omitted in 1907-1908. 

Professor Johnson 

Courses 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, 12, are given in successive years, and 
form a connected series of three years' work, in which the litera- 
ture of the modern period is taken up in detail. They are open 
to all students who have done work of the scope of that in 
Courses 3, 4. 



GERMAN 
Professor Files ; Professor Brown 

1. Grammar. First Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 
Div. A, 1.30; Div. B, 2.30. 

2. Grammar. Translation of modern German prose. Prose com- 
position. Second Semester : Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Div. A, 
1.30; Div. B, 2.30. Professor Brown 

Courses 1, 2 are required of Freshmen who offer French for 
admission, and of all Sophomores who have not previously 
taken these courses or an equivalent. 

3. Prose Composition and Reading. Advanced prose composi- 
tion. Drama of the classical period: Lessing. First Semester: 
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 10.30. 

4. Prose Composition and Reading. Course 3 continued. Drama 
of the classical period : Schiller. Second Semester : Tuesday, 
Thursday, Saturday, 10.30. Professor Files 

Courses 3, 4 are elective for those students who have taken 
1, 2 or an equivalent. They are intended primarily for stu- 
dents who propose to study the language a third year (Courses 
7, 8 or 9, 10) and to give abundant practice in prose com- 
position, in reading German, and in hearing the language 
spoken. The time devoted to class-room work is equally di- 

60 



Courses of Instruction 

vided between composition and reading. In the year 1907- 
1908 the matter for reading and study will be selected from 
the second classical period of German literature. 

5. Fiction and Drama of the Nineteenth Century. A course in 
rapid reading from short stories, novels, and plays — selected from 
the writings of Baumbach, Seidel, Sudermann, and Hauptmann. 
First Semester : Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 8,30. 

6. Fiction and Drama of the Nineteenth Century. A continuation 
of Course 5. Second Semester : Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 
8.30. Professor Files 

Courses 5, 6 are given parallel with Courses 3, 4 and may be 
elected in the same year; they are elective for those students 
who have taken Courses 1, 2 or an equivalent. Courses 5, 6 
are designed to give abundant practice in reading modern Ger- 
man to those who do not wish to continue the study of the 
language a third year ; they may be taken together with Courses 
3, 4 by students who desire to acquire greater facility in read- 
ing German, and to become acquainted with some of the most 
recent fiction and drama by German authors. 

7. History of German Literature to the Nineteenth Century 
Lectures and collateral reading. First Semester : Tuesday, Thurs 
day, Saturday, 11.30. 

8. History of German Literature to the Nineteenth Century. A 
continuation of Course 7. Second Semester: Tuesday, Thursday. 
Saturday, 11.30. Professor Files 

Courses 7, 8 are elective for students who have taken 
Courses 1, 2 and 3, 4 (in special instances also 5, 6), or equiv- 
alents. They are designed to give a careful survey of the 
history of German literature from the earliest times to the 
. nineteenth century. The lectures are in German. In addition, 
a large amount of outside reading is required both in histories 
of German literature, and in assigned texts selected from the 
most important works in the various periods which are being- 
studied. 

61 



Bowdoin College 



9. The Contemporary German Drama. A careful study of some 
of the more important stage-plays of recent years, with special empha- 
sis upon their literary value, their dramatic construction, and the social 
problems involved. The course will comprise also a study of the con- 
temporary drama in Europe and America. First Semester : Tuesday, 
2.30 to 4.30. 

10. The Contemporary German Drama. A continuation of Course 

9. Second Semester : Tuesday, 2.30 to 4.30. 

Professor Files 

Courses 9, 10 are elective for those students who have studied 
German three (or, in exceptional cases, two) years. The courses 
are offered to provide an opportunity for more critical and in- 
tensive study, to all students who are particularly interested in 
the language and the subject. The topic or author to be 
studied in these courses will be changed from year to year. 



SPANISH 
Professor Brown 

1. Grammar, composition, and reading. First Semester : Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday, 11.30. 

2. Continuation of Course 1. Reading of modern prose. Second 
Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 11.30. 

The courses in Spanish may be counted towards the degree of 
A. B. only when both are elected in the same year. They are 
elective for Juniors and Seniors, and, with the consent of the 
instructor, for Sophomores. 

ENGLISH LITERATURE 
Professor Chapman 

1. (a) Augustan Literature. Text-book and lectures, (b) Eng- 
lish Romantic Movement. Text-book and lectures. First Semester: 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9.30. 

2. O) Poets of the Nineteenth Century. Readings, text-book, 

62 



Courses of Instruction 

and lectures. (&) American Literature. Text-book and lectures. 
Second Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9.30. 

Courses i, 2 form a consecutive course throughout the year. 
They are elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

3. (a) Early English Literature. Lectures, with special study of 
" Beowulf" and the "Vision of Piers Plowman." (6) Chaucer and 
the Early Elizabethans. Lectures and readings. First Semester: 
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 1 .30. 

4. (a) Shakespeare. Study of Select Plays, (b) Seventeenth- 
Century Literature. Bunyan, Browne, Walton, Milton, and Dryden. 
Second Semester : Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 1.30. 

Courses 3, 4 form a consecutive course, but either course may 
be taken without the other. They are elective for Seniors. 



RHETORIC AND ORATORY 

Professor Mitchell \ Professor Foster 

ENGLISH 

1. Espenshade's "Composition and Rhetoric." A study of diction 
and of the structure of the sentence and the paragraph. Recitations, 
lectures, readings ; written work with conferences, six long themes 
and occasional page themes ; outside reading : " Pilgrim's Progress," 
"The Jungle Book," "Will o' the Mill," "Virginibus Puerisque," 
" Henry Esmond," " The Golden Treasury," " Henry IV." First 
Semester : Div. A, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 10.30. 
Div. B, Tuesday, Friday, Saturday, 11.30; Thursday, 9.30. 

2. A continuation of the work in Course 1. Genung's " Practical 
Rhetoric." A study of the theme as a whole introductory to the more 
detailed study of exposition, description, narration, and argumentation 
in Courses 3, 4, and 6. Recitations, lectures, readings : written work 
with conferences, five long themes and occasional page themes ; outside 
reading: "Twice Told Tales," "David Copperfield," " Henry V," 
"Franklin's Autobiography," "Treasure Island." Second Semester: 

63 



Bowdoin College 



Div. A, Tuesday. Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 10.30. Div. B, Tues- 
day, Friday, Saturday, 11.30; Thursday, 9.30. 

Professor Mitchell 

Courses 1, 2 are required of all Freshmen. 

3. English Composition. A study of exposition, description, and 
narration. Lectures, recitations, conferences. Seventy-five daily 
themes, seven long themes. Outside reading : " The Scarlet Letter,'' 
Selections from the King James Bible; "A Christmas Carol," 
Wendell's " English Composition." First Semester : Tuesday, 
Thursday, Saturday, 11.30. 

Professor Foster 

4. Rhetorical Study of Modern Prose Writing. Required reading 
from the works of Goldsmith, Burke, Scott, Lamb, Carlyle, Thack- 
eray, Dickens, Ruskin, Emerson, Stevenson. Frequent reports on 
outside reading. Recitations, lectures, conferences. Second Semes- 
ter: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 11.30. Professor Foster 

Courses 3, 4 are elective for Seniors, Juniors, and Sopho- 
mores. Either may be taken without the other. Students 
planning to take Course 6 in Senior or Junior year are advised 
to take Course 3 in Sophomore year. 

5. Public Speaking. Informal lectures ; drill in articulation, in- 
tonation, and gesture; short declamations with criticism by students 
and instructor; longer declamations, previously rehearsed to the in- 
structor, spoken before the class. Second Semester: Div. C, Fri- 
day, 8.30. Div. E, Friday, 9.30. Div. D, Friday, 10.30. Div. F, 
Friday, 11.30. Professor Mitchell 

Course 5 is required of all Freshmen. 

6. Argumentation. Study of the Principles of Argumentation and 
Masterpieces of Forensic Oratory. Preparation of briefs and forensics. 
Conferences. Lectures. First Semester. 

Professor Foster 

Elective for Seniors, Juniors, and, with the consent of the in- 
structor, for Sophomores. 

64 



Courses of Instruction 

7. Debating and other Forms of Public Address. Continuation of 
Course 6. Weekly Debates. Study of the Letter, Editorial, Eulogy, 
Special Address, After-dinner Speech. Second Semester. 

Professor Foster 

Four principal disputants are appointed for each debate, and 

students are required to speak frequently from the floor. The 

meetings are held in Hubbard Hall on Tuesday evenings, 7 to 

9.30, and at one other hour each week. Each debate is followed 

by criticism by the class and by the instructor. 

Students are given credit in this course for work done in the 

Bradbury Prize Debates. 

Elective for those who have taken Course 6. 

8. Debating and Public Speaking. Advanced course. Second 
Semester. Professor Foster 

Elective for those who have passed with credit in Course 7. 

Themes. During the First Semester six themes of not less than 
five hundred words each are required of all Sophomores not taking 
Course 3, and during the Second Semester five themes of all Sopho- 
mores not taking Course 4. Professor Mitchell 

EDUCATION 

Professor Foster 

1. Introduction to the Study of Educational Theories and Practices. 
Recitations, required reading, lectures, reports, school visiting. Second 
Semester : three hours, at the convenience of instructor and students. 

This course treats education as a vital function of society, and 
aims to acquaint the student with sources of material and with 
such general principles as may stimulate and guide further 
study. The scope and character of the work may be judged by 
the following topics : The aims, scope, and methods of educa- 
tion; the special functions of elementary and secondary edu- 
cation ; correlation of studies ; school hygiene ; the relation of 
psychology and ethics to education ; moral and religious educa- 
tion ; adaptation to the individual. 

[2. The General History of Education. The Development of 
schools and school systems. Discussion of contemporary problems 
and tendencies. Lectures, required reading, theses, reports on 
S 65 



Bowdoin College 



school visiting. Second Semester: three hours, at the convenience 
of instructor and students.] Omitted in 1907-1908. 

These courses are planned to satisfy the requirements of those 
states and cities which demand the professional training of 
teachers; but the courses are not intended primarily for teach- 
ers. Rather they aim to be of value to the parent, the citizen, 
the educated individual in any community. In Course 2 a 
limited number of students with high scholarship will have 
opportunities to teach under the direction and criticism of the 
instructor. Philosophy 1 is recommended as preparation for 
the courses in Education. Elective for Seniors and Juniors 
and, in special cases, for Sophomores. 

3. The Teaching of English. First Semester. 
Elective for specially qualified students. 

PHILOSOPHY 

President Hyde; Assistant Professor Burnett 
1. Psychology. Text-book. Lectures, quizzes, and supplement- 
ary reading. First Semester: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 8.30. 

Assistant Professor Burnett 
The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with the facts 
and the principles of the mind. Emphasis is laid upon those 
topics which are most intimately connected with the practical 
life, and a knowledge of which is highly important for a man 
of liberal education. The subject-matter is treated from the 
point of view of natural science and in close dependence upon 
the results of experimental investigation. Where possible, 
class-demonstrations are employed. A part of the time is 
devoted to laboratory work. Elective for Juniors and Seniors, 
and, with the consent of the instructor, for Sophomores. 

2a. History of Ancient and Mediaeval Philosophy, Text-book and 
lectures, with quizzes, outside reading, and short papers. First Semes- 
ter: three hours a week, at the convenience of instructor and students. 
2b. History of Modern Philosophy. A continuation of Course 2a. 
Second Semester at the same hours. 

Assistant Professor Burnett 
The object of these courses is the training of the student in phil- 
osophical inquiry by guiding him along the path through which 

66 



Courses of Instruction 

the occidental mind has arrived at more and more fruitful re- 
sults in reflecting upon the meaning of its deeds and purposes ; 
and upon the significance of the natural world with which it 
deals. They are elective for Juniors and Seniors, and, with 
the consent of the instructor, for Sophomores. Either may be 
chosen without the other. 

3. Introduction to Philosophy. The problems of Nature, Mind, 
Ontology, Cosmology, Theory of Knowledge, and Philosophy of Re- 
ligion; with critical discussion of the proposed solutions : Materialism, 
Spiritualism, Dualism, Pluralism, Creation, Evolution, Realism, Ideal- 
ism, Panpsychism and Theism. First Semester: Monday, Wednes- 
day, Friday, 8.30. President Hyde 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

4. Ethics. Reading of Plato's " Republic," Aristotle's " Ethics," 
Mill's " Utilitarianism," and Spencer's " Data of Ethics." Discussion 
of Hedonistic, Intuitionist, and Idealistic theories. Application of 
ethical principles to the conduct of life. Second Semester: Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday, 8.30. President Hyde 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

5. Practice Course in Experimental Psychology. Second Semes- 
ter: two laboratory periods of two hours each, at the convenience of 
instructor and students. Assistant Professor Burnett 

The object of this course is training in methods of investigation, 
in the discovery and reliance upon evidence, with special refer- 
ence to the particular application to the science of psychology. 
To this end the experiments of pioneer investigators are re- 
peated, and some of the problems of the special senses, of 
apperception, association, feeling, volition, attention are worked 
over in their wake. Elective for students that have taken 
Course 1. 

6. Comparative and Social Psychology. First Semester: three 
hours a week, at the convenience of instructor and students. 

Assistant Professor Burnett 

This course considers the mental life of animals and children 
and the mental aspect of social phenomena. It is elective for 
all students that have taken Course 1. 

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Bowdoin College 



7. Abnormal Psychology. Second Semester : three hours a week, 
at the convenience of instructor and students. 

Assistant Professor Burnett 

This course considers the abnormal facts of mental life, such as 
insanity, hypnotism, multiple personality. It is elective for all 
students that have taken Course 1. 

8. Special Laboratory Investigations. 

Assistant Professor Burnett 

This course admits a few well equipped students to assist the 
instructor in the conduct of original investigations. It is con- 
tinuous throughout the year, and is therefore the equivalent of 
two courses. The hours are determined on consultation. Pre- 
requisite, Courses 1 and 5. 

9. Philosophy of Idealism. Lectures and quizzes, with short 
papers. First Semester: three hours a week. 

Assistant Professor Burnett 

This course aims at the intensive study of a particular philo- 
sophical system and the application of its method in the at- 
tempted solution of the problems arising in a philosophical 
survey of the universe. The work of some important idealistic 
philosopher will be used as a text and discussed in detail. 
Elective for all students that have taken Course 2, 3, or 4. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Allen Johnson 

1. History of England to the Close of the Tudor Monarchy. 
First Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 1.30. 

2. History of England since the Accession of the Stuarts. Second 
Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 1.30. 

Courses 1, 2 form a consecutive course throughout the year. 
Course 2 must be preceded by Course 1. They are elective for 
Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

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Courses of Instruction 

[3. History of Europe to the Close of the Thirty Years' War. 
First Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 1.30.] 

[4. History of Europe since the Peace of Westphalia. Second 
Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 1.30.] 

Courses 3, 4 are given in alternation with Courses 1, 2, and are 
governed by the same rules. Omitted in 1 907-1 908. 

[5. History of the American Colonies to the Establishment of their 
Independence. First Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8.30.] 

[6. History of the United States to the Civil War. Second Se- 
mester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8.30.] 

Courses 5, 6 form a consecutive course throughout the year. 
Course 6 must be preceded by Course 5. They are elective for 
Juniors and Seniors who have taken Courses 1, 2, or 3, 4. 
Omitted in 1907-1908. 

7. History of American Colonization, with special reference to 
problems connected with the Public Domain. First Semester : Mon- 
day, Wednesday, Friday, 8.30. 

8. History of the United States since 1850. Second Semester 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8.30. 

Courses 7, 8 are given in alternation with Courses 5, 6, and 
are governed by the same rules. 

9. European Governments and Parties, with special reference to 
the Constitution and Party System of Great Britain. First Semester: 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9.30. 

10. The Government and Party System of the American Common- 
wealth, with special reference to problems of State and Municipal 
Government. Second Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9.30. 

Courses 9, 10 form a consecutive course throughout the year. 
Course 10 must be preceded by Course 9. They are elec- 
tive for Juniors and Seniors who have taken Courses 5, 
6, or 7, 8. 



69 



Bowdoin College 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

Acting Professor Edwards 

i. Elementary Economics. A general introduction to the subject, 
based on Seager's " Introduction to Economics." Lectures and dis- 
cussion of text-books. First Semester : Tuesday, Thursday, Satur- 
day, 9.30. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

2. Finance. Money, Banking, and Public Finance, with especial 
reference to the United States. Lectures, text-books, and collateral 
reading. Second Semester: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9.30. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors who have taken 
Course 1. 

3. American Social Problems. A course in practical sociology 
designed to acquaint the student with the principal social problems in 
this country, — immigration, the growth of population with its concen- 
tration in cities and the attendant dangers, crime, pauperism, housing 
the working people, the liquor problem, the Negro question. A paper 
on some practical sociological problem will be required of each 
student in the course. Text-book and lectures. First Semester: 
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 11.30. 

4. American Labor Problems. Child labor, woman labor, hours of 
labor, convict labor, labor legislation, labor organizations, capital and 
labor, sweat shops, the servant problem. A paper on some labor 
problem will be required of each student in the course. Text-book 
and lectures. Second Semester : Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 
11.30. 

Courses 3, 4 are elective for Juniors and Seniors who have 
taken Course 1. 

[5a. Economic Theory. The development of economic theory, 
especially in England, to 1848. Emphasis is placed on the relation 
of economic theory to contemporary economic conditions. Lectures, 

70 



Courses of Instruction 

reports, and discussion of assigned readings. First Semester: Tues- 
day, Thursday, Saturday, 10.30.] Omitted in 1 907-1 908. 

5b. Economic Theory. A study of recent contributions to eco- 
nomic theory. Lectures, reports, and discussion of assigned readings. 
First Semester: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 10.30. 

Course 5b will be given in alternation with Course 5a, of which 
it is a continuation. Both are elective upon consultation with 
the instructor for Juniors and Seniors who have taken Course 1. 

6. Sociology. The Subject-matter of Sociology; the Nature of 
Society; Theories of Social Evolution; Possibilities of Social Im- 
provement. Second Semester: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 10.30. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors who have taken Course 1. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Moody; Mr. Stone 

1. Algebra and Solid Geometry. An introduction to graphic 
algebra accompanies a review of portions of the preparatory algebra, 
and is followed by selected topics from series and limits, indetermi- 
nate equations c undetermined coefficients, binomial theorem, choice 
and higher equations. This portion of the work closes before the 
holiday vacation, and the remainder of the Semester is given to solid 
geometry with mensuration and original theorems. First Semester : 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday. Div. A and C, 9.30. 
Div. B, 8.30. 

2. Logarithms and Trigonometry. Elements of the theory of 
logarithms : trigonometry of the right triangle ; practice with four-place 
tables in solving examples from algebra and geometry and simple 
problems of heights and distances. Demonstration of fundamental 
formulas for all angles, and proof of exercises drawn therefrom ; the 
theory and use of six-place logarithmic tables ; the solution of oblique 
triangles, with problems and applications. Second Semester: Mon- 
day, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday. Div. A and C, 9.30; Div. B, 

8.30. 

Professor MoT)dy and Mr. Stone 

Courses 1, 2 are elective under certain conditions for all 
Freshmen except those who pass in these subjects at the en- 

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Bowdoin College 



trance examinations or who elect Physics during Freshman 
or Sophomore year (see p. 55). 

3. Analytic Geometry. Ashton's "Analytic Geometry," with addi- 
tional work on familiar higher plane curves. First Semester : Mon- 
day, Wednesday, Friday, 11.30. 

4. Calculus. Selected topics in differential calculus, with applica- 
tion to problems and curve tracing. Double and triple integration for 
surfaces and volumes. Second Semester : Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday, 11.30. 

Professor Moody 

Courses 3, 4 are elective for those who have taken Courses 1, 
2 or an equivalent. 

[5 and 6. Integral Calculus and Elliptic Functions. Byerly's "In- 
tegral Calculus," with lectures and collateral reading. First and 
Second Semesters : three hours, at the convenience of instructor and 
students.] Omitted in 1907-1908. 

7 and 8. Modern Methods in Pure and Analytic Geometry. First 
and Second Semesters : three hours, at the convenience of instructor 
and students. 

Mr. Stone 

Courses 5, 6 form a consecutive course throughout the year, 
and are given in alternation with Courses 7, 8. They are 
elective for those who have taken Courses 1 to 4 inclusive or 
their equivalents. 

9 and 10. Advanced Algebra. Determinants, theory of equations 
continued from Course 1, and selected topics : three hours, at the con- 
venience of instructor and students. Professor Moody . 

Intended for students who wish a further knowledge of algebra, 
but do not intend to take the more advanced courses in 
Mathematics. Elective for those who have completed Courses 
1, 2. 



72 



Courses of Instruction 

SURVEYING AND DRAWING 

Mr. Hastings 

i. Surveying. In the field work the student is taught the use of the 
chain, tape, compass, level, and transit. In the drawing room the work 
consists in making the computations which occur in the work of the 
surveyor, in making scale drawings, contour maps and profiles from 
notes taken in the field, and in studying the application of contour 
maps in the solution of problems of drainage, road location, etc. First 
Semester: Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday : Div. A, 8.30 to 10.30; Div. 
B, 10.30 to 12.30. 

2. Continuation of Course 1. Second Semester, at same hours. 

3. Descriptive Geometry and Mechanical Drawing. Descriptive 
Geometry with applications ; covering projections of lines, planes, and 
solids bounded by plane surfaces. Drawing instruments and their 
use ; geometrical construction ; mechanical drawing from objects ; 
lettering and dimensioning. First Semester : Tuesday, Thursday, 
1.30 to 4.30. 

4. Continuation of Course 3. Second^ Semester, at the same hours. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 
PHYSICS 

Professor Hutchins; Mr. Stone 

1. Elementary Physics. Lectures and laboratory work. Me- 
chanics, Heat and Magnetism. First Semester : Monday, Wednes- 
day, Friday, 8.30 to 10.30. 

2. Electricity, Sound and Light. Lectures and laboratory work. 
Hastings and Beach's " General Physics " is used for reference and 
as text-book. Second Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8.30 
to 10.30. 

Courses 1, 2 are designed for beginners. 

3. General Physics. Mechanics. Text-books: Ferry's u Practical 
Physics," Part I, and other texts. First Semester : Monday, Wednes- 
day, Friday, 1.30 to 3.30. 

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Bowdoin College 

4. Heat. Text-books: Ferry's "Practical Physics," Part II, 
Preston's " Theory of Heat," Maxwell's " Theory of Heat," and others. 
Second Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 1.30 to 3.30. 

[5. Magnetism and Electricity. Text-books : Thompson's " Elec- 
tricity and Magnetism," Ewing's " Magnetic Induction," and others. 
First Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 1.30 to 3.30.] 

[6. Sound and Light. Text-books: Preston's u Theory of Light," 
and others. Second Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 1.30 to 
3. 30. J Courses 5 and 6 omitted in 1907-1908. 

Courses 3, 4, 5, 6 comprise two years' work in the subject of 
General Physics. They are designed to meet the requirements 
of students who are preparing to teach in secondary schools, 
or who are intending to pursue further work in graduate or tech- 
nical schools. The work in these courses is largely experimental. 
Precision instruments are used and tested, and results are re- 
quired from the use of apparatus constructed wholly or in part 
by the student. Courses 3, 4 are given in alternation with 5, 6. 
They are elective for all who have taken Courses 1, 2 or 
their equivalent. 



ASTRONOMY 

Professor Hutchins ; Professor Moody 

3a and 4a. Spherical and Practical Astronomy. The principal 
properties of the sphere required in Astronomy, celestial co-ordinates, 
latitude, longitude, and time; the positions and motions of the 
heavenly bodies, size and figure of the earth; Kepler's laws; prob- 
lems of gravitation and such questions as arise in navigation. A 
portion of the time is spent in observatory work with the sextant, 
transit and equatorial. The student will make and reduce his own 
observations. Particular attention will be given to time and latitude. 
First and Second Semesters : two hours. 

3b and 4b. Spherical Trigonometry. Proof of fundamental the- 
orems; projection and solution of spherical triangles. First and 
Second Semesters : one hour. 

The foregoing courses combined may be elected by students 
who have completed the work of Mathematics i, 2 or an 
equivalent. Hours are arranged at the convenience of instruc- 
tors and students. 

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Courses of Instruction 

CHEMISTRY AND MINERALOGY 

Professor Robinson 

CHEMISTRY 

i. General Chemistry. Including preparation and properties of 
the common elements and their compounds, and the construction and 
use of chemical apparatus. First Semester : Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday, 10.30 to 12 30. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

2. General Chemistry. Continuation of Course 1. Chemical 
compounds how formed, quantitative relations, chemical theories, 
compounds occurring as minerals. Second Semester : Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday, 10.30 to 12.30. 

Elective for those who have had Course 1 or its equivalent. 

3. Chemical Analysis. Mainly qualitative, with certain funda- 
mental principles of quantitative analysis toward the end of the 
course. First Semester : Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 3 to 5. 

Elective for those who have had Courses 1 and 2. 

4. Quantitative Analysis and Organic Chemistry. The first part 
of the course is a continuation of Course 3, and is followed by ele- 
ments of organic chemistry. Second Semester : Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday, 3 to 5. 

Elective for those qualified by previous courses. 

5. Special and Industrial Chemistry. Including more work in 
chemical preparations, and application of chemistry to industrial 
processes. First Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 2.30 to 

4.30. 

Elective for those qualified by previous courses. May be 
taken with Course 3, at hours arranged by agreement. 

6. Special and Industrial Chemistry. Continuation of Chemistry 5. 
Second Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 2.30 to 4.30. 

Elective for those who have had Course 5. May be taken with 
Course 4, at hours arranged by agreement. 

Note. All the courses in Chemistry involve a large amount of 
laboratory work, for which the department is well equipped. 

75 



Bowdoin College 



MINERALOGY 
I. Determinative Mineralogy. Including elementary crystallog- 
raphy. Second Semester: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 2.30 to 4.30. 

Elective for those who have had Chemistry 1. 
Note. The Cleaveland and other collections of minerals and 
models make it possible to illustrate fully the study of mineralogy. 

BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY 

Professor Lee 

BIOLOGY 

1. Botany. Flowering plants are first studied with reference to 
their anatomy and microscopical structure. Some attention is given 
to plant physiology. Types of the lower orders of plants are then 
examined in detail. About one half of the course consists of labora- 
tory work, in which the student records his observations by notes and 
drawings. The purpose of the course is to present a comprehensive 
view of the vegetable kingdom. Second Semester: Monday, Wed- 
nesday, Friday, 8.30 to 10.30. 

Elective for Sophomores and, under certain conditions, for 
members of other classes. 

2. Zoology. The course opens with a laboratory study of the frog 
as a type of animal life. The lower groups of animals are then taken 
up in order, with laboratory work on the more important forms. 
About one-half of the time is devoted to dissection and microscopical 
work. Text-book: Weysse's " Zoology." First Semester: Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday, 1.30 to 3.30. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

3. Zoology. This is a continuation of Course 2. The principal 
forms studied a**e vertebrates. Some attention is paid to physiology. 
Courses 2 and 3 give a general view of the animal kingdom from uni- 
cellular organisms to man. Second Semester : Monday, Wednesday, 
Friday, 1.30 to 3.30. 

Elective for those who have taken Course 2. 

76 



Courses of Instruction 

4. Anatomy and Histology. This is mainly a laboratory course. 
The anatomy of the cat and that of one or more additional vertebrates 
are thoroughly studied. A series of preparations illustrating elemen- 
tary histology is also prepared. First Semester: Monday, Wednes- 
day, Friday, 10.30 to 12.30. 

Elective for those who have taken or are taking Courses 2 and 
3, and for Juniors intending to take their last year in the 
Medical School. 

5. Histology and Embryology. This course begins with advanced 
histology, followed by a study of the development of a fish, sala- 
mander, the chick, and some mammal. Second Semester : Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday, 10.30 to 12.30. 

Courses 4 and 5 are intended for those who are proposing to 
pursue the study of medicine or to prepare themselves for 
teaching biology. Some opportunity is offered for a selection 
of work in accordance with the special requirement of the stu- 
dent. Practice is also given in technical laboratory methods. 
Elective for those who have taken Course 4. 

6. Organic Evolution. This course includes an examination into 
the theories of the origin and development of life. The topics of 
variation, adaptation, heredity and other problems which arise in con- 
nection with practical biology are discussed. Instruction is given by 
lectures and recitations. Second Semester : Tuesday, Thursday, 
Saturday, 9.30. 

Elective for Seniors. 

GEOLOGY 

1. The first topics considered are the geological forces now at work 
in modifying the earth. Special attention is given to physiography 
and meteorology. In connection with structural geology there is 
some laboratory work on common rock-forming minerals and rocks. 
The course concludes with a brief study of the development of conti- 
nental areas. Text-book : Le Conte's " Elements of Geology." First 
Semester : Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8.30. An additional hour is 
required during the laboratory work. 

Elective for Sophomores and, under certain conditions, for 
members of other classes. 



77 



Bowdoin College 



HYGIENE AND PHYSICAL TRAINING 

Dr. Whittier 

HYGIENE 

Lectures on Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Personal Hygiene. 
First Semester : Thursday, 8.30. 

Required of Freshmen. 
The Director of the Gymnasium gives each student a thorough 
medical and physical examination. From the measurements and 
strength tests taken a chart is made out for each student, showing his 
size, strength, and symmetry in comparison with the normal standard, 
and also what parts of the body are defective either in strength or 
development. At the same time the student receives a hand-book 
containing the exercises prescribed for the purpose of correcting the 
physical defects shown by his chart, with specific directions in regard 
to diet and bathing. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

1. Class exercises : military drill, setting-up drill, and Indian-club 
swinging. Squad exercises (graded to suit the strength of each 
squad) : indoor athletics, chest weights, and heavy gymnastics. 
December to April : Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, 11.30. 

Required of Freshmen. 

2. Class exercises : dumb-bells and boxing. Squad exercises : 
indoor athletics and wrestling. December to April : Monday, 
Wednesday, Thursday, 3.30. 

Required of Sophomores. 

3. Class exercises : fencing with single-sticks and with broad- 
swords. Squad exercise : indoor athletics. December to April : 
Tuesday, Thursday, 4.30; Friday, 3.30. 

Required of Juniors. 

4. Class exercises : fencing with foils. Squad exercise : indoor 
athletics. December to April: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 4.30. 

Required of Seniors. 

78 



Courses of Instruction 



COURSES IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

By vote of the Faculty, the work in Anatomy. Physiology, and 
Chemistry, in the first year of the course in the Medical School, is 
accepted in place of the required four courses of Senior year in the 
Academic department. 

Students intending to avail themselves of this privilege are required 
to register in the Academic department at the opening of the college 
year ; they will then be excused from further attendance until the 
opening of the Medical School. 



79 



&trm(nfstrattoH of tijr (ftollejje 



DEGREES 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred by the Boards of 
Trustees and Overseers, on recommendation of the Faculty, upon 
those students in regular standing who have duly completed the aca- 
demic course prescribed by the regulations of the government of the 
college. 

The degree of Master of Arts is conferred upon those graduates of 
the college who, after taking the Bachelor's degree, complete an ap- 
proved course of advanced study. The requirements for the degree 
of Master of Arts consist of a full year's residence devoted to such 
advanced study under the guidance of one or more members of the 
college Faculty, and a written and oral examination at the completion 
of this work. 

GOVERNMENT 

In all matters pertaining to the good order of the college, and the 
relations of the students to one another, the students govern them- 
selves through a Jury. 

The Jury consists of undergraduate students in good and regular 
standing, chosen as follows : each of the four classes elects one mem- 
ber ; each chartered chapter of an intercollegiate fraternity of three or 
more years' standing in the college elects one member; and all who 
do not belong to any such fraternity elect one member. 

The Jury has absolute and final jurisdiction over all cases of 
public disorder and all offences committed by students against each 
other. The Faculty have jurisdiction over conduct during college ex- 
ercises, conduct toward college officers, damage to college buildings, 
and all matters of personal morality which affect primarily the charac- 
ter and reputation of individual students. 

The members of the Jury for 1 907-1908 have not yet been chosen. 

80 



Administration of the College 

BOARD OF PROCTORS 

Professor Foster, Chairman 
Ridgley Colfax Clark Charles Edward Files 

William Robert Crowley Albert Trowbridge Gould 

Joseph Albert Davis George Palmer Hyde 

ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

The regulation of the athletic interests of the college is accom- 
plished by the Athletic Council of the general Athletic Association 
of Bowdoin College. It consists of twelve members, two of whom are 
chosen from the Faculty of the college, and five each from the alumni 
and student bodies. The members for the year 1 907-1 908 are as 
follows : 

Alumni Students 

Charles Taylor Hawes, Chairman Charles Edward Files (1908) 
Franklin Conant Payson Arthur Lincoln Robinson (1908) 

Henry Asa Wing Harrison Atwood (1909) 

Roland William Mann Kenneth Howard Dresser (1909) 

Barrett Potter Henry Jewett Colbath (1910) 

Faculty 

Professor Charles Clifford Hutchins 
Dr. Frank Nathaniel Whittier 



RELIGIOUS EXERCISES 

All students are required to attend devotional exercises, consisting 
of responsive reading, singing, and prayer, held in the College 
Chapel every week-day morning, and a brief service, including an 
address by the President, on Sunday afternoon. Every student is 
also expected to attend the exercises of public worship on the Sabbath 
at one of the churches in Brunswick. 

Meetings under the direction of the Christian Association, a religious 
organization of the students, are held on Thursday evenings, to which 
6 81 



Bowdoin College 



all members of the college are cordially invited. These meetings are 
addressed from time to time on ethical and religious subjects by 
members of the Faculty and by speakers from elsewhere. 

From time to time during the year, prominent clergymen of various 
denominations are brought to Brunswick as Bowdoin College Preachers. 
They occupy the pulpit of the First Parish church in the morning and 
speak in the College Chapel in the afternoon. 



TERMS AND VACATIONS 

The Academic Year is divided into two semesters, or terms, of 
equal length. Commencement Day is the fourth Thursday of June. 
The Summer Vacation of thirteen weeks follows Commencement 
Day. There are two periods of vacation during the year: the first, 
a recess of about ten days including Christmas and New Year's ; the 
second, the Easter Recess of about ten days at or near the first of 
April. The following are also observed as holidays : Thanksgiving 
Day, Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, and Ivy Day. 



RANK 

The rank of a student in each course is computed on a scale of ten 
(10), but is preserved on the college records in the letters A, B, C, D, 
and E. A signifies a rank from 9 to 10 ; B, a rank from 8 to 9; C, a 
rank from 7 to 8 ; D, a rank from 6 to 7 : E, a rank lower than 6, and 
a condition. 

EXAMINATIONS 

The regular examinations of the college are held at the close of 
each Semester. 

An unexcused absence from an examination entails a mark of zero. 
In case of illness or other unavoidable cause of absence from exami- 
nation, the Secretary of the Faculty has power to suspend the action 
of this rule until the case can be brought before the proper committee. 

82 



Administration of the College 



REPORTS OF STANDING 

A report of the rank of each student is sent to the parent or guar- 
dian at the close of each Semester. The report contains a statement 
of the standing of the student in each of his courses, together with the 
number of unexcused absences from chapel. 

Rank is computed according to the method described above ; it is 
preserved on the college records, and reported to the parent or guar- 
dian, in the letters A, B, C, D, and E. 



ATTENDANCE AT EXERCISES 

Attendance is required of all students at recitations and lectures 
continuously throughout the Semester, and at the daily college prayers 
which are held on each week day at 8.20 A. M., and on Sundays at 
4 P. m. (after the Easter holidays at 5 p. m.). 

REGISTRATION 

All students are required to register on the first day of each Semes- 
ter. The Registrar's office will be open from 8.30 A. M. to 4.30 p. M, 
for this purpose. In case a student is unavoidably absent on the 
opening day, notice should be sent to the Registrar in writing, giving 
cause for absence, and stating probable date of registration. 



MEDICAL ATTENDANCE 

A fund of $1,000, given by Mr. and Mrs. George F. Godfrey of 
Bangor, in memory of their son, Henry Prentiss Godfrey, is de- 
voted to providing medical attendance for students who may be sick 
while in college. 

In case of illness students should immediately call upon or summon 
the college physician. 



83 



The income of over One Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand Dol- 
lars is devoted to scholarships and prizes in aid of meritorious stu- 
dents of slender means. 

Applications for scholarships must be made upon blank forms 
furnished at the office of the Treasurer of the college. They must be 
made out anew each year ; signed by both the student and his parent 
or guardian ; and deposited in the Treasurer's office before Novem- 
ber i. 

Brown Memorial Scholarships. A fund for the support of four 
scholarships in Bowdoin College, given by Hon. J. B. Brown of 
Portland, in memory of his son, James Olcott Brown, A.M., of the 
Class of 1856. 

According to the provisions of this foundation, there will be paid 
annually the income of one thousand dollars to the best scholar in 
each undergraduate class who shall have graduated at the High 
School in Portland after having been a member thereof not less than 
one year. 

Shepley Scholarship. A fund of $1,000, given by Hon. Ether 
Shepley, LL.D., of Portland, late Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Maine. 

Mary L. Savage Memorial Scholarship. A scholarship of 
$1,000, founded by Rev. William T. Savage, D.D., of Quincy, 111., 
in memory of his wife, Mary L. Savage. 

Benjamin Delano Scholarship. A scholarship of $1,000, be- 
queathed by Captain Benjamin Delano of Bath. 

And Emerson Scholarships. A fund amounting at present to 
$7,000, given by And Emerson, Esq., of Boston, through Rev. Dr. 
E. B. Webb. 

Stephen Sewall Scholarship. A scholarship of $1,000, given 
by Deacon Stephen Sewall of Winthrop. 

84 



Scholarships 

The income of the preceding five scholarships is to be appropriated 
for the aid of students preparing to enter the ministry of the Evan- 
gelical Trinitarian churches. 

John C. Dodge Scholarship. A fund of $1,000, given by Hon. 
John C. Dodge, LL.D. 

Alfred Johnson Scholarships. Three scholarships of $1,000 
each, founded by Alfred Waldo Johnson of Belfast, of the Class 
of 1845 m memory of his grandfather, Rev. Alfred Johnson, and 
of his father, Hon. Alfred Johnson. 

William B. Sewall Scholarship. A scholarship of $1,000, 
founded by Mrs. Maria M. Sewall, in memory of her husband, 
William B. Sewall, Esq. 

Mary Cleaves Scholarships. Three scholarships of $[,000 
each, founded by the will of Miss Mary Cleaves. 

Cram Memorial Scholarship. A scholarship of $1, coo, founded 
by Hon. Marshall Cram of Brunswick, in memory of his son, 
Nelson Perley Cram, of the Class of 1861, who lost his life in the 
service of his country. 

James Means Scholarship. A scholarship of $2,000, given by 
William G. Means, Esq., of Andover, Mass., in memory of his 
brother, Rev. James Means, of the Class of 1833, who died in the 
service of his country. 

Charles Dummer Scholarships. A fund of $6,000, given by 
Mrs. Almira C. Dummer, in memory of her husband, Charles 
Dummer, A.M., who was for many years a member of the Board of 
Overseers. 

W. W. Thomas Scholarships. Six scholarships of $1,000 each, 
founded by Hon. W. W. Thomas of Portland, to be awarded under 
certain conditions. 

Buxton Scholarship. A fund at present amounting to $3,700, 
contributed by Cyrus Woodman, Esq., of Cambridge, Mass., in aid 
of deserving students, preference being given to natives and residents 
of Buxton. 

Pierce Scholarship. A scholarship of $1,000, bequeathed by 
Mrs. Lydia Pierce of Brunswick, in memory of her son, Elias D. 
Pierce. 

8S 



Bowdoin College 



Blake Memorial Scholarships. A fund of $4,000, bequeathed 
by Mrs. Noah Woods of Bangor, in memory of her son, William 
A. Blake, of the Class of 1873. 

Huldah Whitmore Scholarships. Two scholarships of $2,500 
each, given by Hon. William Griswold Barrows, LL.D., of 
Brunswick, in memory of his wife, to be awarded by the President 
under certain conditions. 

Nathaniel McLellan Whitmore Scholarship and George 
Sidney Whitmore Scholarship. Two scholarships of $1,000 
each, given by Mrs. Mary J. Whitmore, in memory of her sons, 
Nathaniel McLellan Whitmore, of the Class of 1854, and 
George Sidney Whitmore, of the Class of 1856. 

George Franklin Bourne Scholarship. A scholarship of 
$1,000, given by Mrs. Narcissa Sewall Bourne, of Winthrop. 

Lockwood Scholarship. A scholarship of $1,000, established by 
Mrs. Sarah F. Lockwood in memory of Hon. Amos DeForest 
Lockwood, a former treasurer of the college. 

William Little Gerrish Scholarship. A scholarship of 
$1,000, given by Dr. F. H. Gerrish, in memory of his brother, 
William Little Gerrish, of the Class of 1864. 

Lawrence Scholarships. A fund of $6,000, given by Mrs. 
Amos Lawrence of Massachusetts, the income to be annually 
appropriated for the whole or a part of the tuition of meritorious 
students who may need pecuniary assistance, preference being given 
to those who shall enter the college from Lawrence Academy, at 
Groton, Mass. 

G. W. Field Scholarships. Two scholarships of $2,000 each, 
given by Rev. George W. Field, D.D., of Bangor, of the Class of 
1837. In awarding the scholarships, preference is to be given, first, 
to students or graduates of the Bangor Theological Seminary, and 
second, to graduates of the Bangor High School. 

Justus Charles Fund. A fund established by the will of Justus 
Charles of Fryeburg, for such indigent students as, in the opinion 
of the President, are most meritorious, deserving, and needy. 

Moses R. Ludwig and Albert F. Thomas Scholarship. 
Founded by Mrs. Hannah C. Ludwig of Thomaston. 

&6 



Scholarships 



Joseph N. Fiske Scholarship. A scholarship of $1,000, given 
by Mrs. Charlotte M. Fiske, of Boston, in memory of her 
husband. 

Crosby Stuart Noyes Scholarships. Two scholarships of 
$2,000 each, established by Crosby S. Noyes, A.M., of Washington, 
D. C. In awarding these, preference is to be given to natives or 
residents of Minot. 

Henry T. Cheever Scholarship. A scholarship of $500, given 
by Rev. Henry T. Cheever, D.D., of Worcester, Mass., to be 
awarded by the President under certain conditions. 

Moses M. Butler Scholarships. A fund of $10,000 given by 
Mrs. Olive M. Butler, of Portland, in memory of her husband, 
Moses M. Butler, of the Class of 1845, t0 establish four scholar- 
ships. 

Stanwood Alexander Scholarship. A scholarship of $2,500, 
given by Hon. D. S. Alexander, of Buffalo, N. Y., Class of 1870, 
in memory of his father, Stanwood Alexander, of Richmond, 
Maine, to be awarded under certain conditions. 

Joseph Lambert Fund. Bequest of $1,000 by Mrs. Ann E. 
Lambert, of Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

John Prescott Webber, Jr., Scholarship. $2,500, given by 
John P. Webber, Esq., of Boston, Mass., in memory of his son, 
John Prescott Webber, Jr., of the Class of 1903. 

Ellen J. Whitmore Scholarship. A scholarship of $2,000, 
given by Miss Ellen J. Whitmore, of Brunswick. 

Cyrus Woodman Scholarships. $3,000 given by Miss Mary 
Woodman, of Cambridge, Mass., to establish one or more scholar- 
ships in memory of her father. 

Fred Whitney Flood Scholarship. The sum of $100 is 
given each year by Louis Clinton Hatch, of Bangor, of the Class 
of 1895, as a scholarship in memory of his college-mate, Fred 
Whitney Flood. 

Garcelon and Merritt Fund. The sum of $500 from the 
income of the Garcelon and Merritt Fund is appropriated for 
the aid of worthy students. 

87 



Prizes 

William Law Symonds Scholarship. A fund of $3,000, 
founded by his family in memory of William Law Symonds, of 
the Class of 1854; the income to be applied by the Faculty in aid of 
Bowdoin students, preference to be given to those showing tendency 
to excellence in Literature. 

Class of 1872 Scholarship. A fund of $2,500 given by the 
Class of 1872. 

Charles M. Cumston Scholarship. A fund of $2,000 given 
by Charles McLaughlin Cumston, LL D., of the Class of 1843, tne 
income to be given preferably to a graduate of the English High 
School of Boston. 

Cyrus Woodman Trust Fund. A fund, now amounting to 
$35,000, established by Cyrus Woodman, Esq., of the Class of 1836, 
one-half of the income of which is appropriated for scholarships. 

Charles Carroll Everett Scholarship. Certain real estate 
in Brunswick, in trust, the net income of which is given to that mem- 
ber of the graduating class of Bowdoin College whom the President 
and Trustees shall deem the best qualified to take a post-graduate 
course in either this or some other country. 

Albion Howe Memorial Loan Fund. A sum of $1,000, given 
by Lucian Howe, M.D., of Buffalo, N. Y., for the establishment of 
a loan fund in memory of his brother Albion Howe, of the Class 
of 1861. 

Henry W. Longfellow Graduate Scholarship. Ten thou- 
sand dollars given by the daughters of Henry W. Longfellow — Miss 
Alice M. Longfellow, Mrs. Edith L. Dana, and Mrs. Anne L. Thorp — 
for a graduate scholarship "that would enable a student, after gradu- 
ation, to pursue graduate work in some other College, or abroad, if 
considered desirable; the work to be done in English, or general 
literature, and the field to be as large as possible — Belles Lettres in 
a wide sense. The student to be selected should be some one not 
merely proficient in some specialty, or with high marks, but with real 
ability in the subject, and capable of profiting by the advanced work, 
and of developing in the best way." 

Richard Almy Lee Scholarship. A scholarship providing for 
the tuition of one student. Established by Elizabeth Almy Lee in 
memory of her son, a Senior of the Class of 1908, who, with his friend 

88 



Prizes 

and companion, John Franklin Morrison, of the same class, lost his life 
July 9, 1907, while on a pleasure cruise along the coast. In making 
the award preference will be shown to the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity. 
John Franklin Morrison Scholarship. A scholarship of 
$1,000 founded by Benjamin F. Morrison of Medford, Mass., in 
memory of his grandson John Franklin Morrison of the Class of 1908 
— preference to be given to residents of Medford. 



Smyth Mathematical Prize. A fund of $5,000, the gift of 
Henry J. Furber, Esq., of Chicago, named by him in honor of Pro- 
fessor William Smyth. From the present income of the fund 
$300 is given to that student in each Sophomore Class who obtains 
the highest rank in the mathematical studies of the first two years. 
The rank is determined mainly by the daily recitations; but the 
Faculty may at their discretion order a special examination, the result 
of which will be combined with the recitation rank. The successful 
candidate receives $100 at the time the award is made. The remain- 
ing $200 is paid to him in instalments at the close of each term during 
Junior and Senior years. If a vacancy occurs during those years, 
the next in rank secures the benefit of the prize for the remainder of 
the time. 

David Sewall Premium. A prize amounting to Ten Dollars is 
awarded annually to a member of the Freshman Class for excellence 
in English Composition. 

Brown Composition Prizes. Two prizes, one of Thirty Dollars 
and one of Twenty Dollars, established by Mr. Philip G. Brown, of 
the Class of 1877, m memory of Philip Henry Brown, Esq., of 
Portland, of the Class of 185 1, are offered to the Senior Class for 
excellence in Extemporaneous English Composition. 

Sewall Greek Prize. A prize of Twenty-five Dollars, given 
by Professor Jotham Bradbury Sewall, of Brookline, Mass., of the 
Class of 1848, formerly Professor of Greek in the college, is awarded to 
the member of the Sophomore Class who sustains the best examina- 
tion in Greek. 

89 



Bowdoin College 



Sewall Latin Prize. A prize of Twenty-five Dollars, also 
given by Professor Sewall, is awarded to the member of the Sopho- 
more Class who sustains the best examination in Latin. 

Goodwin Commencement Prize. A prize of Fifty Dollars, 
given by Rev. Dr. Daniel Raynes Goodwin, of Philadelphia, of 
the Class of 1832, is awarded each year to the author of the best 
Commencement Part. 

Class of 1868 Prize. A prize of Forty Dollars, contributed by 
the Class of 1868, is given annually to the author of the best written 
and spoken oration in the Senior Class. 

Pray English Prize. A prize of Fifty Dollars, given by Dr. 
Thomas J. W. Pray, of Dover, N. H., of the Class of 1844, is 
awarded each year to the best scholar in English Literature and 
original English Composition. 

Goodwin French Prize. A prize of Twenty-five Dollars, given 
by Rev. Dr. Daniel Raynes Goodwin, is awarded annually to the 
best scholar in French. 

Noyes Political Economy Prize. This prize, consisting of 
the annual income of one thousand dollars, was established by Crosby 
Stuart Noyes, A.M., and is awarded to the best scholar in Politi- 
cal Economy. 

Class of 1875 Prize in American History. This prize, con- 
sisting of the annual income of three thousand dollars, was established 
by William J. Curtis, of New York City, of the Class of 1875, and 
will be awarded to the student who writes the best essay and passes 
the best examination on some assigned subject in American History. 

Bradbury Debating Prizes. Prizes amounting to $60, given 
by Hon. James Ware Bradbury, LL.D., of the Class of 1825, are 
awarded each year for excellence in debating. 

Hawthorne Prize. A prize of $40, given by Mrs. George C. 
Riggs (Kate Douglas Wiggin), of New York, is awarded each year 
to the author of the best short story. The competition is open to 
members of the Sophomore, Junior and Senior Classes, 

Alexander Prize Fund. This fund was established by Hon. 
D. S. Alexander, of the Class of 1870, to furnish two prizes of $20 

90 



Prizes 

and $10 for excellence in select declamation. Competition is open to 
Juniors, Sophomores and Freshmen. 

Philo Sherman Bennett Prize Fund. This fund was estab- 
lished by Hon. W. J. Bryan from trust funds of the estate of the 
late Philo Sherman Bennett, of New Haven, Connecticut, the pro- 
ceeds to be used for a prize for the best essay discussing the prin- 
ciples of free government. Competition is open to all students taking 
History 7. 

Almon Goodwin Prize Fund. This fund of $1,000 was estab- 
lished by Mrs. Maud Wilder Goodwin, in memory of her husband, 
Almon Goodwin, of the class of 1862. The annual income is awarded 
to a Phi Beta Kappa man to be chosen by vote of the Trustees of the 
College at the end of the recipient's Junior year. 



9i 



Bowdoin College 



COLLEGE BILLS 

Bills, containing college charges, are mailed to the parent or guardian 
of each student at the close of each Semester ; these bills become 
payable at once. 

No students will be advanced in class standing until all the dues 
of the previous year have been paid ; and no degrees will be conferred 
upon students who have not paid all their dues to the college. 

No student will be dismissed from college on request unless he 
shall have paid all his college bills, including that of the current 
Semester. 

EXPENSES 

The following tables are taken from the Bowdoin College Bulletin, 
New Series, No. 10, a pamphlet entitled Earnings and Expenses of 
Bowdoin College Students, which will be sent on application. The 
facts in this pamphlet were obtained in returns from nearly two hun- 
dred Bowdoin undergraduates. The first table furnished by a very 
recent graduate of the college, now an officer in the institution, gives 
items kept accurately by him while an undergraduate. It is a low 
expense account. 

ist year 2nd year 3rd year 4th year 

Tuition $75-°° $7S-°° $75-°° $75-°° 

Other college charges n. 10 7.32 11.60 24.06 

1 Room 64.00 18.00 36.00 18.00 

Board 108.00 108.00 108.00 108.00 

Books 10.18 10.58 11.33 l °-5° 

College organizations 12.85 6.25 27.65 27.8 r 

Laundry (part taken home) ... 1.43 1.74 1.85 3.05 

Furniture 18.75 

Lighting 1.88 3.30 3.00 

Heating 4.18 4.13 4.98 

Incidentals 1.89 2.91 2.13 1.00 

Total $305-08 $237.28 $277.69 $275.40 

I This student did not rent a room from the college after ist year. 

92 



Expenses 






There follows an average expense account. It is that of a student 

with an independent income, and no need of economy. He enjoyed 

the most expensive room and board at the college, and was a leader in 

many activities. 

ist year 2nd year 3rd year 4th year 

Tuition $75-°o $75-°° $75-°° $75-°° 

Other college charges .... 4.00 6.00 9.00 17.00 

Room (with room-mate) .... 54.00 54.00 54.00 54.00 

Board 140.00 140.00 140.00 140.00 

Books 11.00 14.00 17.00 20.00 

Fraternity • . • 20.00 17.00 17.00 17.00 

College organizations 12.00 15.00 28.00 18.00 

Laundry 11.00 10.00 12.00 12.00 

Incidentals 20.00 32.00 28.00 30.00 

Total .... $347.00 $363.00 $380.00 $383.00 

Rooms in the college dormitories may be rented at prices varying 
from $36 to $54 a year for each occupant where two share the room. 
The price is doubled for a single occupant. The item of steam heat 
is included. Electric lights are furnished at the rate of $6 per 16 
c.p. lamp per year. None of the college rooms are furnished. 

SELF-HELP 

Bowdoin College Bulletin No. 10 furnishes some interesting facts 
concerning the earnings of Bowdoin students. Of the 192 students 
from whose reports that pamphlet was compiled, 167 earned a part or 
all of their college expenses. The amounts reported include scholar- 
ships, prizes, and the income of the vacations. These 167 men earned, 
during the year 1906-7, a total of $37,709.76. The average amount 
earned was $225. In the Senior Class, 20 men earned during this 
year $5670.26, the average amount being $283.51. These same men 
earned during their college course $18,045.99. Here are at least 20 
men in a single class who, during their four years at Bowdoin College, 
have earned an average of $902.34. 

In the pamphlet from which these facts are taken will be found 
many other concrete items, such as ways for earning money, which 
will interest the prospective student obliged to support himself wholly 
or in part. This pamphlet will be sent on application. 

93 



£i)e (tolltQt HuiVtiin&n 

There are eleven college buildings. The spacious campus, of about 
forty acres, upon which they are grouped is within five minutes' walk 
of the railroad station, one mile from the Androscoggin River with its 
picturesque falls, and about three miles from the shores of Casco Bay. 
A central heating and lighting plant supplies steam heat and electric 
light to all the buildings, which are also connected with the water and 
sewerage systems of the town. 

MASSACHUSETTS HALL 

This hall, named for the mother state from which the college 
derives its charter, was the first building erected for the uses of the 
college. On the first floor are the offices of the treasurer and the 
registrar of the college, and the room of the President and Faculty. 
In this room are the quaint old colonial fireplace and oven as used 
for a time by the family of the first president. 

The second and third floors have been thrown together and con- 
verted into a cabinet of natural history through the liberality of the 
late Peleg Whitman Chandler, of the Class of 1834, and named the 
Cleaveland Cabinet, in memory of Prosessor Parker Cleaveland. It 
contains, besides other collections, the mineralogical collection which 
has the special interest of having been the basis of Professor Cleave- 
land's "Treatise on Mineralogy and Geology," the first systematic 
treatise on mineralogy published in this country. 

THE DORMITORIES 

There are three dormitories, of brick and stone, each one hundred 
feet by forty, and four stories in height. In the order of their erection 
they are Maine Hall, named for the District (now the State) of 
Maine ; Winthrop Hall, named in honor of Governor John Winthrop 
of the Massachusetts Bay Colony ; and Appleton Hall, named in 
honor of President Jesse Appleton, the second president of the col- 
lege. Each of these dormitories contains thirty-two suites, consisting 
of a sitting-room or study, a bedroom, and an ample closet. The 
rooms are heated and lighted with steam and electricity from the 
central station, and the dormitories are supplied with water from 
the town system, and provided with toilet rooms. 

94 



The College Buildings 



KING CHAPEL 

The chapel, built of undressed granite, and named in honor of 
Governor William King, the first Governor of Maine, is a Romanesque 
Church, the facade of which is marked by twin towers and spires which 
rise to the height of one hundred and twenty feet. The aisles and 
chancel are shut off from the nave by partition walls. The nave is the 
chapel proper, in which are held the daily religious exercises of the 
college. There is a broad central aisle, from either side of which rise 
the ranges of seats after the manner of a cathedral choir. The plat- 
form, with the reading-desk, occupies the entire width of the chapel at 
its eastern end, and behind it rises the rood-screen of carved and 
panelled walnut, surmounted by a rood-gallery affording entrance to 
an upper room in the chancel; and through this entrance is seen, from 
the chapel below, an oriel window. From the walnut wainscoting on 
the sides of the chapel to the clerestory windows an unbroken wall, 
more than thirty feet in height, is divided by decorative frescoing 
into large panels in which are mural paintings — the gifts of indi- 
viduals and of college classes — representing the Annunciation, the 
Adoration, the Baptism, and the Ascension, Paul preaching at 
Mars Hill, the Healing at the Beautiful Gate, St. Michael and the 
Dragon, Adam and Eve after the Transgression, and the Giving of 
the Law. A decorated ceiling which is carried up into the roof has a 
blue ground overlaid with golden stars. The music gallery is over 
the entrance to the chapel, between the two towers, and contains an 
organ which was a gift to the college from Oliver Crocker Stevens, 
of the Class of 1876, and Mrs. Stevens. 

The right aisle of the building is devoted to the uses of a psycho- 
logical laboratory. The left aisle contains the rooms of the Chris- 
tian Association. At the rear is a lecture room known as Banister 
Hall. This room was named to commemorate the Hon. William B. 
Banister of Newburyport, Mass., whose friendship and influence had 
been kindly and effectually exercised in behalf of the college and the 
members of whose family had contributed to its funds. 

MEMORIAL HALL 

This building, erected by the contributions of alumni and friends, 
is a memorial to the graduates and students of the college who served 

95 



Bowdoin College 



in the Union army or navy during the Civil War. It is a granite 
structure in the French-Gothic style of architecture. On the first 
floor are four recitation rooms. The memorial hall proper occupies 
the whole of the second floor, and is a spacious audience room used 
for exhibitions and other public exercises. Aside from its architec- 
tural and decorative finish, it is notably adorned with busts and por- 
traits of presidents, professors, benefactors, and distinguished graduates 
of the college. The names and military rank of two hundred and 
ninety Bowdoin men who fought to maintain the Union are inscribed 
on bronze tablets, the gift of Thomas Hamlin Hubbard, of the 
Class of 1857. 

MARY FRANCES SEARLES SCIENCE BUILDING 

This building was a gift to the college from Mr. Edward F. Searles, 
in memory of his wife, whose name it bears. It is built of Perth 
Amboy brick, with trimmings of Ohio stone, and is practically fire- 
proof. It is of the Elizabethan style of architecture, one hundred 
and eighty feet in length, and, with its two wings, one hundred and 
five feet in depth. It is three stories in height, with a high, well- 
lighted basement, and contains the college clock, which strikes the 
hours and half-hours. It is designed for the use of the three depart- 
ments of chemistry, physics, and biology, and contains both large and 
small laboratories for each of these departments, with lecture rooms, 
offices, store rooms, cabinets, a work room for the manufacture of 
apparatus, a conservatory for plants, etc. It is fitted with all the 
devices and conveniences which experience has found to be desirable, 
and is fully adapted to the uses for which it was designed. 

WALKER ART BUILDING 

This building, designed for the exhibition of the art treasures of the 
college, — except the portraits and busts in Memorial Hall and the 
mural paintings in King Chapel, — was erected by the Misses Harriet 
and Sophia Walker, of Waltham, Massachusetts, as a memorial of 
their uncle, the late Theophilus Wheeler Walker. It is one hundred 
feet in length by seventy-three in depth, and is surrounded on three 
sides by a brick-paved terrace, about twenty-five feet in breadth, with 
granite supporting walls and parapets. The materials used in the 
building are Freeport granite, Indiana limestone, and brick. 

The main entrance consists of a loggia, in front of which, and 
supporting the wall above, are six Ionic columns of stone. Niches 
in the front wall of the building on either side of the loggia contain 

96 



The College Buildings 

bronze copies, by De Angelis of Naples, of the classical statues of 
Demosthenes and Sophocles. Pedestals on either side of the ascent 
to the loggia are surmounted by copies in stone of the lions of the 
Loggia dei Lanzi. 

The entrance from the loggia is to the Sculpture Hall, occupying the 
central portion of the building, beneath a dome which rises to the 
height of forty-seven feet, and furnishes light to the apartment 
through a skylight at the top. The four tympana below the dome, 
each twenty-six feet in width, are filled with four paintings symboliz- 
ing the artistic achievements of Athens, Rome, Florence, and Venice, 
executed by Messrs. John La Farge, Elihu Vedder, Abbott Thayer, 
and Kenyon Cox, respectively. Casts of classical figures and groups 
of statuary are exhibited in this room. 

The Bowdoin, Boyd, and Sophia Wheeler Walker Galleries are 
entered from three sides of the Sculpture Hall. The Bowdoin Gallery 
contains chiefly the collection of about one hundred paintings, and 
one hundred and fifty original drawings by old and modern masters 
bequeathed to the college by Honorable James Bowdoin. The Boyd 
Gallery contains the collection of paintings bequeathed by Colonel 
George W. Boyd, of the Class of 1810, with others of later acquisition, 
a collection of Japanese and Chinese works of art, loaned by Professor 
William A. Houghton, the Virginia Dox collection of objects of 
native American art, and collections given or loaned by Mr. George 
W T . Hammond, Mrs. Levi C. Wade, Mr. Harold M. Sewall, Dana 
Estes, and other friends of the college. The Sophia Wheeler Walker 
Gallery contains specimens of ancient glass, Roman sculpture, old 
Flemish tapestry, Oriental ivory carvings, miniatures, etc., with paint- 
ings and drawings by modern artists of the foremost rank, and a 
bronze relief portrait, by French, of Theophilus Wheeler Walker, — 
all given by the Misses Walker. 

The galleries are finished in oak, and are lighted from above 
through large skylights. In the basement are a lecture room, a room 
of Assyrian sculpture, curator's and students' rooms, lavatory, etc. 
The building is open to visitors about five hours daily. 

HUBBARD HALL 

The recently erected library building affords convenient and ade- 
quate accommodation for the College Library, and for its prospective 
growth, with reading and consultation rooms, lecture and conference 
rooms, administrative offices, etc. It is a gift to the college from 
General Thomas Hamlin Hubbard, of the Class of 1857, and his 

7 97 



Bowdoin College 

wife, Mrs. Sibyl Fahnestock Hubbard. It is about one hundred 
and seventy feet in length, and fifty feet in depth, with a wing in the 
rear, for a stack room, eighty-eight feet by forty-six. It is entirely 
fire-proof, the materials used in its construction being granite, In- 
diana, limestone, brick, iron, and steel. It is of the seventeenth- 
century Gothic architecture, with the main entrance through a central 
projecting tower, the facade being still further broken by semi-circular 
projections at the ends. It is situated at the southern end of the 
campus, fronting towards Massachusetts and Memorial Halls, and, 
with the buildings already mentioned, completes the campus quad- 
rangle. 

SETH ADAMS HALL 

This hall is built of brick with stone trimmings, is about one hundred 
feet long by fifty wide and is three stories and a half in height. It is 
named in honor of the late Seth Adams, of Boston, who contributed 
generously to its erection. On the first floor is the office of the dean of 
the Medical School and also two recitation rooms assigned to the use 
of the academical department. The second and third floors are de- 
voted exclusively to the uses of the medical department, each floor 
having a large amphitheatral lecture room with an adjoining office for 
the instructor. On the second floor is the laboratory of bacteriology 
and pathology and the office of the college physician. The third and 
fourth floors are given to the Seavey Anatomical Museum, the dis- 
secting-room, and the newly completed physiological laboratory. 

THE OBSERVATORY 

The Astronomical Observatory, for which the college is largely 
indebted to the late John J. Taylor, of Fairbury, Illinois, was mainly 
designed for purposes of instruction. Although it is the smallest of 
the college buildings, great care was exercised in its construction, and 
it is supplied with a telescope mounted in a revolving turret, a transit 
instrument, and the usual accessories for meridian observations. 

THE HUBBARD GRAND-STAND 

The Grand-Stand, given by Gen. Thomas H. Hubbard, of the Class 
of 1857, at a cost of about $35,000, provides permanent quarters for 
out-of-door athletics. 

98 



The College Buildings 



The building stands on a terrace three feet above the field level. 
It is one hundred and twenty-three feet long and thirty-seven feet 
wide. The walls are on a cement foundation. Below the terrace 
level they are of granite, and above they are of rubble or field stone 
as far as the tops of the basement windows, where there is a water 
table of granite. Above the water table the walls are of selected red 
brick. The frame is of steel and iron, and the roof is covered with 
green slate. 

The interior of the building is of fire-proof construction throughout. 
The west end of the basement is occupied by the quarters for the 
home teams, and consists of dressing-room, lavatory, store-room and 
drying-room. The east end provides quarters for the visiting team, 
also instructor's office, janitor's room and boiler-room. The base- 
ment is heated by steam and lighted by electricity. The lavatories 
are supplied with hot and cold water. 

The grand-stand occupies the whole of the second floor. It has 
a seating capacity of five hundred and eighty, with promenade eight 
feet wide, in which, if necessary, extra seats can be placed. Shutters 
protect the open part of the grand-stand during winter. 

THE SARGENT GYMNASIUM 

The gymnasium, erected in 1885, is named in honor of Dr. Dudley 
Allen Sargent, of the Class of 1875, tne fi rst director under the system 
of required physical exercise. It is supplied with the most approved 
apparatus for gymnastic instruction, the gift of Dr. Sargent, and is 
provided with bath rooms and individual lockers. A part of the base- 
ment of this building and an extension in the rear are used as a 
central station for generating steam heat and electricity for the heating 
and lighting of all the college buildings. 

A straight path through the pine grove in the rear of the campus 
leads from the gymnasium a short distance to the Whittier Athletic 
Field. This field, named in honor of Dr. Frank Nathaniel Whittier, 
the present director of the gymnasium, who was largely instrumental 
in the acquisition and preparation of it for athletic purposes, is about 
five acres in extent, and is well adapted, in all respects, for baseball, 
football, and track athletics. 



99 



Bowdoin College 



The Library contains eighty-eight thousand volumes and several 
hundred unbound pamphlets. It includes the private library of Hon. 
James Bowdoin, received after his death in 1811, the library of the 
Medical School of Maine, established in 1820, the extensive collec- 
tions of the Peucinian and Athenaean Societies, added in 1880, and 
valued donations received from numerous institutions and individuals 
during the century of its existence. A large proportion of its con- 
tents, however, has been purchased within the last two decades with 
a view to aid the work of instruction, by supplying both teachers and 
students with the best books and the leading periodicals in the various 
departments of the curriculum. 

Attention has been directed, also, towards the building up of a com- 
plete and attractive library of general reference in which the literature 
of the present, as well as of the past, is given its proper place, and 
which shall serve as an active agent in the attainment of liberal 
culture. This portion of the library, containing upwards of ten 
thousand volumes, is arranged in the spacious and well-lighted room 
at the east end of Hubbard Hall. The corresponding room on the 
west is given to some six thousand bound volumes of magazines that 
are indexed in Poole's Index to Periodical Literature, and to the 
current periodicals, of which the library receives about two hundred. 
Adjacent is^a special reading-room for the daily newspapers, and 
another for a choice collection, not yet complete, of fine editions of 
the works of the great masters of literature. 

The entire collection is classified by the Decimal Classification and 
is supplied with a dictionary card catalogue. The library is a de- 
pository of the catalogue cards issued by the Library of Congress and 
this bibliographical collection of increasing value and serviceableness 
can be consulted by any investigator. Though no formal instruction 
in bibliography is given, the librarian and his assistants are ready to 
lend personal aid to inquirers. Moreover, through the cooperation of 
the Department of Rhetoric, the librarian is enabled to meet all the 
new students in groups of eight or less at required conferences of an 
hour each in which the use of the card catalogue, the principles that 

100 



The Library- 



govern the location of books, and the scope of certain common works 
of reference has been set forth by practical exercises. During term 
time, the library is open continuously from 8.30 a.m. to 5.30 p.m., 
and in the evening from 7 to 9.30. In vacation it is also open daily, 
with the exception of Sundays and holidays. Students are allowed to 
borrow three books at a time, and to retain them, if needed, four 
weeks. The privileges of the library are extended to graduates and 
to clergymen, also to any persons on recommendation of the Library 
Committee. 

Annual accessions, which average three thousand volumes, are 
made to the library by means of an appropriation of the Boards for 
the purpose, and from the proceeds of funds contributed by Rev. 
Elias Bond, D.D., John L. Sibley, A.M., Hon. Samuel H. Ayer, Dr. 
R. W. Wood, Mrs. John C. Dodge, Henry J. Furber, Esq., and 
Hon. John L. Cutler. A special collection of books relating to the 
Huguenots is annually increased from the income of a book fund given 
by George S. Bowdoin, Esq. A similar library of rhetoric and litera- 
ture has been recently established by the late Captain John C. Brown, 
U. S. A., as a memorial of his father, Philip Henry Brown, Esq., of 
the Class of 1851. 



101 



MEDICAL SCHOOL OF MAINE 



jFantlts 

REV. WILLIAM DeWITT HYDE, D.D., LL.D., President. 

ALFRED MITCHELL, M.D., LL.D., Dean, Professor of In- 
ternal Medicine, 

STEPHEN HOLMES WEEKS, M.D., LL.D., Professor Emeritus 
of Surgery, 

FREDERIC HENRY GERRISH, M.D., LL.D., Professor of 
Surgery, 

CHARLES OLIVER HUNT, A.M., M.D., Professor of Materia 
Me die a and Therapeutics, 

FRANKLIN CLEMENT ROBINSON, A.M., LL.D., Professor of 
Chemistry, 

LUCILIUS ALONZO EMERY, LL.D., Professor of Medical 
furisprudence, 

CHARLES DENNISON SMITH, A.M., M.D., Professor of 
Physiology, 

ALBERT ROSCOE MOULTON, M.D., Professor of Mental 
Diseases, 

WILLIS BRYANT MOULTON, A.M., M.D., Professor of Oph- 
thalmology and Otology, 

JOHN FRANKLIN THOMPSON, A.M., M.D, ^/^w^/^- 
eases of Women. 

ADDISON SANFORD THAYER, A.B., M.D., Professor of 
Diseases of Children. 

FRANK NATHANIEL WHITTIER, A.M., M.D., Professor 
of Pathology and Bacteriology, 

EDWARD JOSEPH McDONOUGH, A.B., M.D., Professor of 

Obstetrics. 
CHARLES BRYANT WITHERLE, A.B., M.D., Professor of 

Neurology. 

WALTER EATON TOBIE, M.D., Professor of Anatoi?ty. 

HENRY HERBERT BROCK, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor 
of Clinical Surgery, 

!05 



Medical School of Maine 

ALFRED MITCHELL, Jr., A.B., M.D., Instructor in Genito- 
urinary Surgery, 

GUSTAV ADOLF PUD0R, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Der- 
matology. 

EDVILLE GERHARDT ABBOTT, A.B., M.D., Clinical In- 
structor in Orthopedic Surgery. 

GILBERT MOLLESON ELLIOTT, A.M., M.D., Demonstrator 

of Anatomy. 

RICHARD DRESSER SMALL, A.B., M.D., Demonstrator of 
Histology, and Instructor in Obstetrics. 

HERBERT FRANCIS TWITCHELL, M.D., Instructor in Clini- 
cal Surgery. 

WILLIAM HERBERT BRADFORD, A.M., M.D., Instructor in 
Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 

ARTHUR SCOTT GILSON, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Surgery. 

WILLIAM LEWIS COUSINS, M.D., Instructor in Clinical 
Surgery. 

JAMES ALFRED SPALDING, A.M., M.D., Clinical Instructor 
in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

GILMAN DAVIS, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 

JAMES EDWARD KEATING, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Internal 
Medicine. 

W. BEAN MOULTON, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Diseases 
of Wo7nen. 

FRED PATERSON WEBSTER, M.D , Instructor in Diseases 
of Children. 

EDWIN WAGNER GEHRING, B.S., M.D., Instructor in 

Physiology. 

THOMAS JAYNE BURRAGE, A.M., M.D., Assistant Demon- 
strator of Histology. 

CHARLES HENRY HUNT, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Materia 

Me die a. 
WALLACE WADSWORTH DYSON, M.D., Instructor and 

Assistant Demonstrator in Anatomy. 

106 



Faculty 



CHARLES LANGMAID CRAGIN, M.D., Assistant Demonstrator 

of Anatomy. 
PHILIP PICKERING THOMPSON, A.B., M.D., Assistant 

Demonstrator of Anato7ny. 
GEORGE THOMAS LITTLE, Litt.D., Librarian. 



HON. WILLIAM LE BARON PUTNAM, LL.D., from the 

Board of Trustees. 
JOSEPH EUGENE MOORE, Esq., A.M. from the Board of 

Overseers, 
JOHN ADAMS MORRILL, Esq., A.M., from the Board of 

Overseers. 
ALBERT ISAIAH YORK, M.D., Visitor from the Maine Medical 

Association. 
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN STURGIS, M.D., Visitor from the 

Maine Medical Association. 



107 



lateral Statement 

The Medical School of Maine, established by the first legislature of 
the State, was by its charter placed under the control of the Boards of 
Trustees and Overseers of Bowdoin College, of which institution it 
is the Medical Department. 

Its course of instruction covers four years of eight months each. 
The studies are distributed through the curriculum according to the 
following schedule : 

First Year : Anatomy, Embryology, Histology, Physiology, 
Chemistry, and Personal Hygiene. 

Second Year : Anatomy, Physiology, Chemistry, Pathology, 
Bacteriology. 

Third Year : Internal Medicine, Surgery, Materia Medica and 
Therapeutics, Diseases of Women, Obstetrics, Diseases of the Skin. 

Fourth Year: Internal Medicine, Surgery, Materia Medica and 
Therapeutics, Medical Jurisprudence, Public Hygiene, Diseases of 
Women, Diseases of Children, Diseases of the Mind, Neurology, 
Clinical Instruction in Diseases of the Skin, Diseases of the Genito- 
urinary System, Diseases of the Eye, Diseases of the Ear, Diseases of 
the Joints, Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

The students of the first and second years are instructed at Bruns- 
wick, where the school has been situated since its foundation in 1820, 
and where the facilities are excellent for imparting a knowledge of the 
primary branches. The third and fourth year classes are taught in 
Portland on account of the superior clinical advantages afforded in that 
city. The building designed for the use of the school and now occu- 
pied by it furnishes ample accommodations for the advanced classes. 
The location of the building is on Chadwick Street, near the Maine 
General Hospital, in which institution nearly all the teachers in the 
school are medical or surgical officers, and the Directors of which are 
in full sympathy with the purposes of the Faculty. 

While the Maine General Hospital is the chief source of supply of 
clinical material for the school, Portland has a number of other insti- 
tutions which will contribute to the bedside instruction of the stu- 

108 



General Statement 

dents; and the various teachers, as opportunity permits, will show 
individual pupils interesting cases in their private practice. 

The eighty-eighth annual course began on Thursday, the 24th of 
October, 1907, and will continue eight months. 

Examinations for admission to the school will be held at 9 a.m. on 
Thursday, October 22, 1908, in Brunswick. Final examinations for 
each class will be held in the period from June to to 24, 1908, inclusive. 

Re-examinations, deferred examinations, and examinations for ad- 
vanced standing for those who desire to enter the second year will 
be held in Brunswick, on Friday, October 23, 1908, examination in 
anatomy at 9 A.M., in physiology at 2 p.m. Re-examinations, de- 
ferred examinations, and examinations for advanced standing for those 
wishing to enter the third year will be held in Portland on Saturday, 
October 24, 1908, examination in anatomy at 9 a.m., in physiology 
at 2 p.m. Re-examinations, deferred examinations, and examinations 
for those wishing to enter the fourth year will be held in Portland on 
Friday and Saturday, October 23 and 24, 1908, at hours to be here- 
after appointed. 

At the end of the first, second and third years, students who have 
passed successful examinations will receive certificates from the 
Dean. 

A student who fails to pass any branch at the required examination 
in June may present himself for re-examination at the beginning of the 
next course ; if he then fails to pass or fails to present himself, he may 
be examined at the end of three weeks at the examination provided 
for those who enter late. If he fails at this examination, he shall not 
again be examined in that branch until the expiration of the year, 
unless admitted to conditions by vote of the faculty on recommenda- 
tion of the head of the department in which he has failed. 

On recommendation of the head of a department, any student who 
has failed on examinations as above provided in the study of that de- 
partment may by vote of the faculty be allowed to enter upon the work 
of the next year, but he shall not be admitted to any examination of 
that year until he shall have passed a satisfactory examination in the 
study or studies which he has previously failed to pass. 

No student will be admitted to the privilege of conditions if he has 
failed in more than two departments. 

Every student who fails to maintain a satisfactory standard of work 

109 



Medical School of Maine 

will be warned of his deficiency from time to time, before the end of 
the term. 

An examination which is not completed receives no consideration. 

The systematic courses of instruction will begin on Monday morning, 
October 26, 1908. 

On arriving in Brunswick students should apply at the office of the 
Dean in the medical building, enter their names, receive directions 
concerning their examinations, if any are needed, pay their fees and 
be advised as to boarding-places. 

In Portland they should apply at the office in the medical building 
for the same purposes. Dr. Charles O. Hunt will act as deputy dean. 



EXPENSES 

For Instruction: In each of the required four years, $100. 
After attendance upon four full courses, payment of the matriculation 
fee only will be required. 

For Examinations : Payable at the end of the first year — 

In Anatomy $5.00 

In Physiology 5.00 

In Chemistry 5.00 

Payable at the close of the term of instruction in 

Obstetrics, for examination in this branch . . . 5.00 

These four fees are credited on the diploma or graduation fee. 

For every re-examination in any of the above studies, $3.00. This 
fee is not credited on the diploma fee. 

For examination or re-examination in any branch, at a time not 
regularly appointed, a fee of $5.00 must be paid, in addition to the 
prescribed fee for that examination. 

Miscellaneous : The matriculation fee of $5.00 is required of 
every student each year. 

For materials used in the chemical laboratory courses, $4.00 for first 
course, $3.00 for second course. 

For materials used in the physiological laboratory, $2.00. 

For materials used in the bacteriological laboratory, about $2.00. 

For anatomical material, its cost. 

no 



Requirements for Admission 

For graduation fee (not returnable), including the parchment 
diploma, $25.00. This will have been nearly paid in the examination 
fees in the previous years. 

Graduates of other schools, who have been engaged three years in 
the regular practice of medicine, may receive a general ticket upon 
presentation of their diplomas and payment of the matriculation fee. 
Graduates of other schools are not eligible for a degree from this 
school without attendance upon a full course of instruction imme- 
diately preceding the examination for such a degree. 

All fees must be paid in cash and strictly in advance. 

Unfurnished rooms heated by steam can be secured in the Col- 
lege dormitories at a rental of from $72 to $to8. Furnished rooms 
outside the College can be obtained at a rental of from $1.50 to 
$2.50 per week according to the conveniences. A sharing of the 
above expenses by two students brings the cost within reasonable 
limits. 

The price of board is from $3.00 to $3.50 a week. 

The cost of living in Portland has been found to be not in excess 
of that at Brunswick. 

$15 to $25 a year covers the cost of books. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

The requirements for admission correspond to the requirements 
laid down by the Association of American Medical Colleges, with 
the exception that one year of Chemistry is specifically required. 
These requirements are as follows : 

Section i. (a) A bachelor's degree from an approved college or 
university. 

(b) A diploma from an accredited high school, normal school, or 
academy requiring for admission evidence of the completion of an 
eight-year course in primary and intermediate grades, and for gradu- 
ation not less than four years of study embracing not less than two 
years (4 points) of foreign languages, of which one must be Latin, two 
years (4 points) of mathematics, two years (4 points) of English, one 
year (2 points) of history, two years (4 points) of laboratory science, 
and six years (12 points) of further credit in language, literature, 
history or science. 

in 



Medical School of Maine 

(c) An examination in the following branches: A. Required (18 
points): Mathematics (4); English (4) ; history (2); language (4 — 2 
must be Latin) ; science (taken from physics, chemistry, botany, 
zoology; 4). B. Optional (12 points); English (2); history. (6); 
language (6) ; manual training (2) ; mechanical drawing (1) ; natural 
science (botany, zoology; 2); physical science (chemistry, physics; 
2); trigonometry (1) ; astronomy (1) ; civics (1); geology (1) ; physi- 
cal geography (1) ; physiology and hygiene (1) ; political economy 
(1) — not more than 3 points accepted. 

(One point in any subject in a high school or academic course 
demands not less than five periods per week of forty-rive minutes 
each for eighteen weeks.) 

(d) Certificates from reputable instructors recognized by the super- 
intendents hereinafter to be mentioned, or by any state board of 
medical examiners duly authorized by law, may be accepted in lieu 
of any part of this examination. 

Section 2. This examination will be conducted by the Superinten- 
dent of Schools of Brunswick. 

Section 3. A student may be allowed to enter on his medical work 
conditioned in not more than six points, and these conditions must 
be removed by satisfactory examination before he is allowed to enter 
on the second year of his medical course. 

Business colleges are not recognized. 

Students from other schools who apply for advanced standing 
must comply with the requirements for admission to the first year, 
must give satisfactory evidence that they have completed a course or 
courses of instruction, equivalent in kind and amount to that or those 
in this school preceding that to which admission is sought, and must 
pass examinations in all of the branches previously pursued by the 
class which they wish to enter. Certificates of the passage of exami- 
nations in other schools are not accepted in lieu of examinations. 

Students in the Senior Class of the Academic department are 
permitted to take the studies of the first year in the Medical 
department and thus are eligible for the first year final Medical 
examinations. 

It is desired that a literal interpretation shall be placed upon 
the stated requirements of the candidates for matriculation, as 
hitherto there have been not infrequent examples of those who 

112 



Graduation 

inquire if other conditions than those named will not serve in 
lieu of the examination. The same consideration is asked for 
the explicit condition named as regulating the pre-payment of 
fees in cash. 



GRADUATION 

A candidate must be twenty-one years of age, and must have 
devoted to his professional studies four years, including a course of 
instruction in each of these years in some reputable, regular, incor- 
porated medical institution ; and the last course previous to examina- 
tion must have been in this school. He must present a satisfactory 
certificate of good moral character from a citizen of the place in 
which he resides. He must also pass a satisfactory examination in 
the required studies, previously specified, and present a thesis on 
some medical subject, a fair copy of which must be handed to the 
Dean at least ten days before the beginning of the final examinations. 

Time spent in pharmacy, in dental and veterinary institutions, and 
in preparatory schools does not entitle a student to examination for 
advanced standing. 

A student who has received the degree of A.B., B.S., or any similar 
degree after four years of study in a recognized college or technical 
school, may, if his studies have included a satisfactory amount of 
chemistry, physics and biology, be admitted as a second-year student ; 
but when so admitted, he cannot gain third-year standing until he has 
passed satisfactory examinations in the studies of the first and second 
years. The faculty of this School are unanimously of the opinion that 
only under most exceptional conditions should this requirement be 
made available, and that practically a student ought not to enter upon 
the studies of the second year until he has passed satisfactory exam- 
inations in the studies of the first year. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION 

In order to give to prospective students an idea of the facilities pre- 
sented by this institution for acquiring a knowledge of the science and 
art of medicine, a brief statement is here made of the scope of the 
work in each department, and the methods adopted for imparting 
instruction. 

8 113 



Medical School of Maine 

Anatomy. The course in this branch extends over two years, and 
covers every portion of human anatomy with special reference to its 
application in the practice of medicine and surgery. The scope is so 
extensive as to require a number of instructors and a division of the 
work ; but an attempt is made to harmonize the various divisions and 
enable students to spend their time to the best possible advantage. 
In the lecture room every part of human anatomy is taken up by 
systems as arranged in Gerrish's Text-Book. Some subjects are 
treated by lectures and many by demonstrations, but the greater 
part of the work consists of recitations and demonstration quizzes. 

First-year students study embryology, histology, osteology, ar- 
thrology, and visceral anatomy, including the study of the cerebro- 
spinal axis and organs of the special senses. Second year work 
includes the remainder of systematic anatomy and relational anatomy. 
The class-room work is made valuable by the exhibition of dissected 
parts, models, and casts ; and from time to time students are required 
to present drawings of different organs. Considerable attention is also 
paid to surface anatomy, which is studied on the living model. 

During the first year, every tissue and organ is studied miscroscop- 
ically in the histological laboratory and reproduced by free-hand draw- 
ing. Late in the term, first-year students dissect some of the higher 
vertebrates or such parts of human anatomy as are included in their 
work. In this way they not only reinforce their text-book knowledge 
but acquire manual dexterity invaluable to them for the dissecting- 
room work of their second year. 

The practical gross anatomy is taken up late in the second year 
after the entire subject of anatomy has been studied by systems in 
the class-room. A period of six weeks is devoted to this work, during 
which time no other exercises are held for second-year men in this or 
any other department, and each student is required to dissect an entire 
lateral half of the human body. 

At the end of the first year, students are required to pass a written 
and an oral examination in the work of the year and to identify organs 
and tissues that they have studied, gross and microscopic. Second- 
year students must pass a written and oral examination in the work of 
their year and identify the parts of the dissected human subject. 

Before coming to the school, students can do much to equip them- 
selves for appreciation of human anatomy by making dissections of 
some lower animals, and are advised to follow the directions prescribed 

114 



Methods of Instruction 

in " Physiology Practicums " which will be sent post-paid for one 
dollar by the author, Prof. B. G. Wilder, Ithaca, N. Y. 

The Anatomical Museum is well supplied with wet and dry speci- 
mens, casts and models ; and a large number of disarticulated skeletons 
are provided which may be borrowed by the class. 

Physiology. Instruction in this department is conducted with ref- 
erence to the practical application of the facts of human physiology to 
the needs of the student, in his study of the diagnosis and treatment 
of disease. Class-room demonstrations and experimental laboratory 
teaching are employed, so far as they can be made to serve this 
purpose. The instruction will be given by practical laboratory work, 
text-book recitations, and supplementary lectures. The laboratory 
is fully equipped with the Harvard apparatus. 

The work of the first year will be devoted to study by practical 
laboratory exercises, extending over half the term, of the functions of 
Nutrition. Special attention will be given to the physiology of Nerve 
and Muscle, of the Blood, including its microscopical study, Digestion 
and the physics and other phenomena of Circulation and Respiration. 
Students will be taught to demonstrate for themselves the essential 
facts connected with these functions. Written reviews will be held 
from time to time besides regular quizzes upon both the didactic and 
laboratory work. The work of the second year will be devoted to 
the study of Reproduction, the Nervous System, the Special Senses, 
and Voice and Speech. 

The department is well equipped with charts, models, and apparatus 
for demonstration and experimental work, admirably adapted to aid 
in giving students a thoroughly practical course in Physiology. 

A laboratory fee of $2.00 will be charged. Students will furnish 
their own instruments for nerve-muscle dissection, and will be charged 
with the cost of any breakage of apparatus. 

In connection with this course several hours will be devoted to the 
subject of Personal Hygiene. 

Chemistry. The chemical courses extend over the first two years. 
They consist of lectures, conferences, and laboratory work, occupying 
from three to six hours per week for each class. As a knowledge of 
general inorganic chemistry is required for admission, first-year men 
begin with the application of general chemistry to the qualitative 

"5 



Medical School of Maine 

analysis of simple substances. This is followed by the principles 
and practice of quantitative analysis, especially volumetric. The 
examples used in analysis are selected with special reference to the 
work of a physician, and include water, air and the inorganic poisons. 
The analytical courses take the first half year. The second half 
year with first-year men is given to general organic chemistry, in 
which the structure, preparation, and relation of structure to proper- 
ties are illustrated in cases of the simpler compounds. Second-year 
students begin with a study of the more complex organic compounds 
related to medicine, such as the synthetic coal-tar compounds, the 
alkaloids, ptomains, and leucomains. This is followed by physiologi- 
cal chemistry, including analysis of urine and other secretions. 

The aim is to make the chemical courses as practical as possible. 
To this end the student is taught to prepare many of the solutions and 
test substances, as well as to use them. He is taught also how 
to construct apparatus, manipulate glass tubing, etc. The facilities 
afforded by the Searles Science Building make it possible to do this 
to an unusual degree. 

Students who have completed in other schools courses of study 
equivalent to the above, may, upon examination, be excused from any 
of them. 

Each student is required to pay in advance a laboratory fee, cover- 
ing the average cost of chemicals, gas and water. This is $4.00 for 
first-year men, and $3.00 for second. In addition each will pay for 
apparatus broken or not returned at the end of the term. 

Obstetrics. Instruction in this department will be given by lec- 
tures and recitations. The instructor in Obstetrics will demonstrate 
for the class, in sections, work on the manikin ; the diagnosis of posi- 
tion and presentation, the mechanism of normal labor; the manoeuvres 
necessary in the delivery of abnormal cases, version and application of 
forceps. Each member of the class will have a chance to perform 
these various manipulations. 

It is hoped that an arrangement will be made whereby the city 
maternity cases will be at the disposal of the teachers, so that clinical 
instruction may be given to the class in sections, and individual cases 
furnished for each member. 

Internal Medicine. Instruction in this department continues 
throughout the third and fourth years. During the first half of the 

116 



Methods of Instruction 

third year the time is devoted mainly to the study of Diagnosis. The 
remaining weeks of the course include consideration of special dis- 
eases following the order usually found in standard text-books. The 
fourth year comprehends the study of such special diseases as were 
not considered in the preceding year. 

In connection with this department there will be given special 
and additional instruction relating to the conduct of life insurance 
examinations. 

During both years class-room instruction is given didactically and 
by means of regular recitations. 

A clinic is held at the Maine General Hospital upon each Thurs- 
day morning from nine to eleven o'clock ; the material being received 
from the wards of the hospital and occasionally from outside sources. 

Care is taken to afford the students opportunities for personal 
examination of cases with the prominent object of having them become 
familiar with physical signs. It is hoped that material of the City 
Hospital and patients out of the hospital, under the care of the City 
Physician, may be made available during the coming year. 

This department recognizes with that of Surgery our special in- 
debtedness to the Staff of the Portland Charitable Dispensary in that 
it affords sections of our classes opportunities for clinical observation 
and physical exploration. 

Pathology and Bacteriology. The new, commodious, and 
amply equipped laboratory in Seth Adams Hall gives excellent facili- 
ties for instruction in bacteriology and pathological histology. The 
course in clinical pathology is given in the laboratory at the school 
building in Portland. 

Instruction is given by lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. 
For convenience it is divided into four courses. 

i. Bacteriology. This course is given to second-year students, and 
occupies fourteen hours a week from the beginning of the term until 
the Christmas recess. Each student is required to cultivate on media 
twelve varieties of pathogenic bacteria and to study their character- 
istics. Principles of disinfection are studied, and verified by experi- 
ment. A limited number of inoculation experiments are performed. 
Students make bacteriological examination of water and milk. Special 
attention is given to the laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis, diph- 
theria, and typhoid fever. 

117 



Medical School of Maine 

2. General Pathology, including Pathological Histology. This 
course is given to second-year students. Instruction occupies four- 
teen hours each week, and lasts from January ist to April ist. 
McFarland's text book is used as a basis for this course. The text- 
book is supplemented by lectures on special subjects. As far as 
possible the consideration of a subject in the class-room is followed 
by a study of the same subject in the laboratory. During the latter 
part of the course much time is given to diagnosis work upon micro- 
scopical preparations. 

3. Blood Examination. This is a short course given to second- 
year students during the last week in May and the first week in June. 
Students are trained in counting the red and white corpuscles, in 
estimating the amount of hemoglobin, in preparing and examining 
fresh and stained specimens. 

4. Clinical Pathology. This course is given to third-year students. 
It includes instruction given as opportunity occurs at the surgical 
clinics and a fifty-hour course at the school laboratory in Portland. 
In this course each student examines microscopically the tissues 
and other pathological material obtained at the clinics at the Maine 
General Hospital. 

Surgery. The instruction in surgery is given by lectures, recita- 
tions, demonstrations, clinics, diagnosis exercises on the patient, and 
operations on the cadaver. It extends throughout the third and 
fourth years of the course, and in the highest possible degree is 
practical in character. 

In the didactic course the recitation method is employed for the 
most part, as being particularly helpful to the students, — necessitating 
careful preparation of each lesson, allowing no essential point to be 
slighted, and stimulating pride by the certainty of each that his work 
will be compared with that of his fellows. But the lecture method is 
used whenever it seems serviceable, as in the introduction of new 
topics, the presentation of the salient features of unfamiliar subjects, 
and the explanation or amplification of matters not adequately treated 
in the text-book. 

The students perform a large variety of operations upon the 
cadaver, under the immediate direction and supervision of the 
teacher. The application of bandages and other dressings is taught 
in the most practical manner. 

118 



Methods of Instruction 

The principal clinical teaching is given at the Maine General 
Hospital by the six visiting surgeons, all of whom are professors, 
assistant professors, or clinical instructors in the school. Twice in 
each week some of these teachers hold exercises in diagnosis, in 
which the students are instructed in proper methods, and privileged 
to make personal examination of cases. Sections of the class are 
taken in turn through the wards, and are given opportunities for the 
cbservation of the after-treatment and progress of patients, upon 
whom they have seen operations performed. A system of notification 
by telephone enables the students to obtain prompt information of 
accident cases, which are brought into the hospital. The amount 
of clinical material at this institution far exceeds the capacity of the 
classes to appropriate it without neglecting other and essential 
studies. The surgeons of the Portland Charitable Dispensary permit 
sections of the class to observe cases at their daily service — a privi- 
lege highly valued and constantly accepted, as the kind of diseases is 
largely different from those usually seen at the hospital. The City 
Hospital, also, occasionally presents interesting and useful material. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. Instruction in this de- 
partment is given during the third and fourth years. 

In the third year the teaching is by lectures and quizzes. Special 
attention is given to the study of pharmacology, or the action of 
drugs, as it is only by a thorough knowledge of this part of the 
subject that medicines can be properly employed for the correction of 
the abnormal conditions found in disease. 

Considerable time, every week, is devoted to prescription writing. 
By this exercise, students not only learn to write prescriptions cor- 
rectly, but to make application of their knowledge of drugs in the 
treatment of disease. They are required to prescribe for supposed 
patients, a description of whose symptoms has been given them. 
These prescriptions are put before the class for criticism and discus- 
sion, and have proved very useful in making their knowledge of drugs 
definite and practical. 

In the fourth year the lectures and quizzes will be continued, and 
there will also be a recitation course in practical therapeutics. These 
courses supplement each other. In the course in Materia Medica 
individual drugs are studied, and their modification of certain con- 
ditions, which may be found in many different diseases. In the 
course on therapeutics, a study is made of the symptoms of a given 

119 



Medical School of Maine 

disease, and of the different drugs that may be employed to relieve 
them. 

Medical Jurisprudence. The instruction in Medical Jurispru- 
dence will be directed mainly to an exposition of the legal duties and 
responsibilities of physicians and surgeons to their patients, and also 
to an exposition of their character and position as medical expert wit- 
nesses in courts of justice. Practical suggestions will be given for 
guidance in both respects. 

Gynecology. The course in Diseases of Women will continue 
through the third and fourth years. Third-year students will have work 
mainly didactic in character. Fourth-year students will be given a 
course in the pathology (gross and microscopic) of the Diseases of 
Women. There will also be weekly clinics for fourth-year men, at 
which the examination of female patients will be an important feature. 

Diseases of Children. Instruction will be given by recitations, 
lectures, clinical demonstrations and study of cases by individual 
students with reports and discussions by members of the class. 

Mental Diseases. The professor of this department is chief 
medical officer of the Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane. Espe- 
cial efforts are made to instruct the students in the early recognition 
of insanity, with a view to the institution of treatment at the time 
when it is most productive of good results. 

Ophthalmology and Otology. The instruction in these de- 
partments will be given by lectures and clinics. A weekly clinic will 
be held at the hospital on Saturday, at 9 a. m. The various diseases 
will be described as cases illustrating them are available for demon- 
stration. Operations will be performed when required, and other 
treatment applied as may be necessary. 

Public Hygiene. Instruction fs given by the Professor of Physi- 
ology who is a member of the State Board of Health, by lectures upon 
the principles of Public Sanitation, considering the source and char- 
acter of public water supplies and the collection and disposal of waste, 
with special reference to preventable diseases. 

Several hours are devoted to sanitary legislation and the relations 
and obligations of the practising physician to the public and to health 
boards in the management of infectious diseases. 

120 



Text-Books 

Neurology. Instruction in Neurology will be given to the fourth 
class each week throughout the course by lectures, clinics, and quizzes, 
two hours of each week being devoted to such instruction. 

Genito-Urinary Surgery. Instruction in Genito- Urinary Sur- 
gery will be given to the fourth class each week during the first half 
of the course. 

Dermatology. Instruction in Dermatology will be given to the 
third-year class each week during the first twenty-four weeks of the 
course. 

Orthopedic Surgery. A clinic in Orthopedic Surgery will be 
held at the Hospital on each Friday, at 9 a.m. 

Diseases of the Nose and Throat. The fourth class will 
receive special instruction, both didactic and clinical, in Diseases of 
the Nose and Throat. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Library of the Medical School, containing 3,700 volumes, has 
been combined with that of the College. Both collections, numbering 
together 88,000 volumes, are under the same administration and are 
at the service of the medical students. The more recently published 
medical works and current numbers of professional journals are kept in 
a separate room in the main library building for the especial use of 
these students. It is not the policy of the school to furnish text-books 
through its library, or to buy largely in medical literature ; yet, by means 
of the catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon General's Office and the 
system of inter-library loans, the librarian is able to procure for use 
in serious investigation almost any book that may be desired. 



Anatomy. Gerrish. For reference, Quain. Applied Anatomy, 
Bardeleben. For use in Histological Laboratory, Dunham. 

Physiology. For recitation work, Brubaker's Text-book of 
Physiology. For reference, Landois, Howell's " American Text- 
book of Physiology." For laboratory, Hall's " Experimental Physi- 

121 



Medical School of Maine 

ology." For reference, Porter's "Introduction to Physiology" and 
Sterling's "Practical Physiology." 

Chemistry. For general reference, Simon, Bartley, Pellew. For 
reference in urinary analysis, Purdy, Black, Tyson. For use in 
laboratory, Robinson's " Qualitative Chemical Analysis." 

Public Hygiene. For reference, Harrington, Coplin and Bevan, 
Parke's " Practical Hygiene," Abbott's " Hygiene of the Transmis- 
sible Diseases." 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. For recitation work, 
Hare. For reference, White and Wilcox, H. C. Wood, Cushney, 
Stevens. 

Practice of Medicine. Osier, Hare, Tyson. For reference, 
Strumpell, Loomis and Thompson's "System of Practical Medicine." 

Diagnostic Methods. Sahli. 

Physical Diagnosis. Cabot, Greene. 

Bacteriology. For reference, Abbot, McFarland, Park, 
Williams. 

Pathology. For recitation work, McFarland. For reference, 
Ziegler, Delafield and Pruden, Coplin, Green. 

Clinical Pathology. For reference, Mallory and Wright, 
Lenhartz-Brooks, Wood. 

Surgery. For recitation, Brewer. For reference, Park. Minor 
surgery, Wharton. Surgical patholology, Warren. 

Obstetrics. Williams, Webster, Edgar, Hirst, Reynolds, and 
Newell. 

Diseases of Women. Dudley, Penrose, Reed, Kelly (2 vols.). 

Diseases of Children. Holt, Rotch, Williams. 

Medical Jurisprudence. Taylor with Bell's Notes, Ewell. 

Diseases of the Eye. Nettleship, Swanzay, De Schweinitz. 

Diseases of the Ear. Bacon, Field. 

Neurology. Dana's " Text-book of Nervous Diseases," or 
Oppenheim's "Diseases of the Nervous System." 

122 



Text-Books 

Dermatology. Walker's " Introduction. ,, Crocker on Diseases 
of the Skin. 

Orthopedic Surgery. Bradford and Lovett. 

Genito-Urinary Surgery. Caspar, Morton. 

Nose and Throat. Bishop, Knight, Kyle. For reference, L. 
Brown. 

Dictionaries. Dorland Illustrated, Gould. 



123 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS AND SPECIAL 
FITTING SCHOOLS 



aittmnt ^association* 

THE GENERAL ASSOCIATION 

President, Franklin Conant Payson, Esq. ; Vice-President, 
Charles Taylor Hawes ; Secretary and Treasurer, Dr. George 
Thomas Little, Brunswick, Me. 

ASSOCIATION OF BOSTON 

President, Sylvester Benjamin Carter, A.M. ; Secretary, 
Henry Smith Chapman, 201 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 

THE BOWDOIN CLUB OF BOSTON 

President, Henry Smith Chapman ; Secretary, Alfred Benson 
White, Esq., 84 State Street, Boston, Mass. 

ASSOCIATION OF NEW YORK 

President, Edward Page Mitchell, Litt.D.; Secretary, Dr. 
Frederick Henry Dillingham, 148 West 85th Street, New York 
City. 

ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON 

President, Hon. Melville Weston Fuller, LL.D.; Secretary, 
William Frye White, Maryland Building, Washington, D. C. 

ASSOCIATION OF PORTLAND 

President, Charles Freeman Libby, LL.D.; Secretary, Perci- 
val Proctor Baxter, First National Bank Bldg., Portland, Me, 

ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY 

President, Samuel Clifford Belcher, Esq., A.M. ; Secretary, 
George Colby Purington, A.M., Farmington, Me. 

127 



Bowdoin College 



ASSOCIATION OF SAGADAHOC, KNOX AND 
LINCOLN COUNTIES 

President, Eugene Thomas, A.M. ; Secretary, Henry Woodbury 
Cobb, 123 North Street, Bath, Me. 

ASSOCIATION OF OXFORD COUNTY 

President, Hon. Addison Emery Herrick, A.M.; Secretary, 
Frank Kimball, Esq., Norway, Me. 

KENNEBEC ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

President, Hon. Orville Dewey Baker, A.M.; Secretary, John 
Clair Minot, Augusta, Me. 

BANGOR ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

President, P^ranklin Augustus Wilson, A.M.; Secretary, Dr. 
Bertram Lewis Bryant, A.M., Bangor, Me. 

ASSOCIATION OF PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

President, Dr. John Clement Parker; Secretary, Alfred 
Perley Ward, Esq., 171 Westminster Street. 

ALUMNI RECORD 

It is desired to keep as full a record as possible of the residences, 
occupations, and public services of the alumni. Information is solic- 
ited in regard to these points, and also in regard to matters appro- 
priate to the obituary record annually published by the college. 

The last edition of the General Catalogue, issued in June, 1902, 
with a supplement containing names of the Class of 1903, is a bound 
octavo of 266 pages, and will be mailed to any address on the receipt 
of fifty cents. 

Communications should be addressed to the College Librarian. 

128 



Special jFttttttfl Schools 

The schools noticed on the following pages have been constituted 
special Fitting Schools for Bowdoin College by the action of their 
several Boards of Trustees, in concurrence with the College Boards. 
They are annually examined by representatives of the college. 
Graduates of the schools, however, are required to pass the regular 
college entrance examinations for admission, at the same dates and 
under the same conditions as are prescribed for students of other 
preparatory schools, unless the school is approved by the New 
England College Entrance Certificate Board. 



FRYEBURG ACADEMY 

Fryeburg, Me. 

Incorporated February 9, 1792. 

Charles Glidden Willard, A. M., Principal. 

This school offers five courses of study, of four years each 2 
I. A Classical College Preparatory Course. 
II. A Scientific College Preparatory Course. 

III. An English Course. 

IV. A Business Course, including two years' training in Stenog- 

raphy and Typewriting. 
V. A Normal Training Course. 
The Academy is on the approved list of the New England College 
Entrance Certificate Board. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition. The cost of tuition is $10.00 per term for all branches, 
music, drawing, and painting included. 

Board. The cost of board in the dormitories is $3.00 a week, in- 
cluding heating and lights. Rooms in private houses may be obtained 
at from 30 to 50 cents a week. Board in clubs, if desired, can be had 
at very cheap rates. 

9 129 



Bowdoin College 



CALENDAR 

Fall Term of 15 weeks began September 10, 1907. 

Winter Term of 11 weeks begins January 7, 1908. 

Spring Term of 11 weeks begins April 7, 1908. 

Fall Term of 15 weeks begins September 8, 1908. 

Examiner appointed by the college for 1907- j 908 : Professor Files, 



WASHINGTON ACADEMY 
East Machias, Me. 

Incorporated March 7, 1792. 
Ralph Stanley Smith, A.B., Principal. 

This Academy offers three courses of study : 
I. A College Preparatory Course of four years. 
II. A Scientific Course of four years. 
III. An English-Commercial Course of four years. 
The Academy is on the approved list of the New England College 
Entrance Certificate Board. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition. The tuition fee is $8.00 a term, and covers all expenses 
for laboratory and commercial equipment. Vocal music, drawing, and 
elocution are offered free to all students. 

Board. The cost of board and room is from $3.50 to $4.00 per 
week. Rooms can be obtained at very low rates by students who 
wish to board themselves. There are exceptional opportunities for 
students who wish to work for their board. 

CALENDAR 

Fall Term of 14 weeks began September 9, 1907. 

Winter Term of 12 weeks begins December 30, 1907. 

Spring Term of 12 weeks begins March 30, 1908. 

Examiner appointed by the college for 1 907-1908: Professor Foster 

130 



Special Fitting Schools 

LINCOLN ACADEMY 

Newcastle, Me. 

Incorporated February 23, 1801. 

George Howard Larrabee, A.M., Principal. 

This school offers three courses of study : 

I. A College Preparatory Course, of four years. 
II. An English Course, of four years. 
III. Teacher's Training Course, of four years. 
The academy is on the approved list of the New England College 
Entrance Certificate Board. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition. Fall and Spring Terms, $6.00 to $7.00; Winter and 
Summer Terms, $4.00 to $5.00. 

Board. Board can be obtained at from $3.00 to $4.00 per week. 
Rooms for self-boarding may be secured at reasonable rates. 

CALENDAR 

Fall Term of 11 weeks began September 9, 1907. 

Winter Term of 8 weeks begins December 2, 1907. 

Spring Term of 11 weeks begins February 3, 1908. 

Summer Term of 8 weeks begins April 27, 1908. 

Examiner appointed by the college for 1 907-1 908 : Professor Sills. 



THORNTON ACADEMY 

Saco, Me. 

Incorporated February 16, 181 1. 

Ernest Roliston Woodbury, A.B., Principal 

This academy offers four courses of study, of four years each : 
I. A Classical College Preparatory Course. 
II. A Scientific College Preparatory Course. 

III. An English Course. 

IV. A Business Course. 

!3i 



Bowdoin College 

The academy is on the approved list of the New England College 
Entrance Certificate Board. 

EXPENSES 

Tuition. Tuition in each course is $10.00 a term, payable in 
advance. Those desiring to take special studies will be charged $5.00 
a term for each study. 

Board. Board can be obtained in the city at from $4.00 to $6.00 
a week. 

Books. Students not residents of Saco must purchase their own 
books. 

CALENDAR 

Fall Term began September 10, 1907. 

Winter Term begins December 30, 1907. 

Spring Term begins March 31, 1908. 

Fall Term begins September 8, 1908. 

Examiner appointed by the college for 1 907-1 908 : Professor Brown. 



The University Press, Cambridge, U.S.A.